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Ron Paul: US in Georgia to protect a pipeline

Ron Paul: US in Georgia to protect a pipeline

Press TV
September 11, 2008

US Congressman Ron Paul says the United States is in Georgia not for democracy but to protect an oil pipeline bypassing Russia.

“We are not for democracy there – we are there to protect a pipeline. And that is tragic for me,” he said.

The remarks came as the US Senate Committee on Armed Services held a hearing to cast Moscow as an aggressor in the 5-day conflict in the Caucasus region but a rift among the members hampered decision making.

Another US congressman has accused Georgia of triggering the conflict despite the Bush administration’s taking side with Tbilisi.

Read Full Article Here

 

$1 Billion Aid to Georgia Could Have Helped The Poor

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ygg2uWsKK6w

Ron Paul and Ralph Nader on CNN – (9/10/2008)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eEw0qKjP7hk

Ron Paul Statement to the National Press Club
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LhdufSTRdV0

Ron Paul rejects McCain campaign’s plea for endorsement
http://rawstory.com/n..ul_offers_support_to_thirdparty_0910.html

Ron Paul urges Americans to vote for third-party candidates
http://www.russiatoday.com/news/news/30258

 



Saakashvili Planned to Flee Georgia During Conflict

Saakashvili asked the U.S. to send him a plane in the heat of the conflict
It turns out Georgian President Mikhail Saakashvili planned to leave the country

KP
August 21, 2008

The information barrier in Georgia has complicated the local population’s ability to understand how the events truly unfolded in South Ossetia. For over two weeks, the Georgian intelligence has maintained control over foreign news sources.

All Russian sites and “enemy TV” have been blocked. However, the government’s official propaganda was dealt a serious blow yesterday when the country’s only Russian-language newspaper Vecherniy Tbilisi published an interview with renowned political scientist Ramaz Klimiashvili.

Klimiashvili said that “based on information from the presidential chancellery and U.S. governmental structures, Mikhail Saakashvili requested that a plane be sent in for him when the threat neared of Russian forces taking Tbilisi.”

When the news began to spread, Klimiashvili writes, the opposition started to panic. Despite their many differences, Saakashvili was maintaining control over the situation and “without him at the helm the country would sink into chaos.”

The political scientist says Saakashvili wouldn’t have launched a full-scale military operation without U.S. consent.

“Was the U.S. really unaware that Russia would respond just like they did years back in Kosovo?” he asks. “I don’t exclude the possibility that to a large extent Bush was interested in seeing Russia’s reaction — whether the country was ready to utilize the Kosovo option. Russia was forced to act decisively to avoid looking helpless in the eyes of the Caucasus people.”

Klimiashvili believes that little good will come of the South Ossetian war.

“I don’t doubt the August affairs may one day be seen as more of a catastrophe than Georgia’s loss of Abkhazia in 1993,” he said. “We don’t yet know what is really going on… If the U.S. is involved here, then the guilt should be on their conscience.”

 



Putin Blames U.S. For Staging Georgian Conflict

Putin Blames U.S. For Staging Georgian Conflict

Steve Watson
Infowars.net
August 29, 2008

In an interview with CNN, Russia’s Prime Minister Vladimir Putin has stated that the Georgian-South Ossetian conflict may have been manufactured by the White House for domestic political reasons. Putin also says that preliminary reports show U.S. citizens may have been present in the combat zone.

“We have serious reason to believe that American citizens were right at the heart of the military action. This would have implications for American domestic policy.” Putin told CNN.

“If this is confirmed, then it raises the suspicion that someone in the US specially created this conflict to worsen the situation and create an advantage in the competitive struggle for one of the candidates for the post of president of the United States.” he continued.

“They needed a short, victorious war.”

“And if it didn’t work out, they could always put the blame on us, make us look like the enemy and against the background of this surge of patriotism, once more rally the country around a particular political force.” Putin explained.

Watch a Russia Today report on Putin’s comments:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xg-GX-XtRkY

In addition to the remarks broadcast by Russia Today, Putin charged that Americans on the ground in Georgia were “implementing orders” from their “leader” during the conflict.

“The fact is that US citizens were indeed in the area in conflict during the hostilities. It should be admitted that they would do so only following direct orders from their leaders,” Putin said.

“Therefore, they were acting in implementing those orders, doing as they were ordered, and the only one who can give such orders is their leader,” he added.

The comments come in the wake of news that a U.S. passport was found in a building in South Ossetia occupied by Georgian troops.

As we have documented, reports of American mercenaries being captured and found dead inside South Ossetia and Georgia circulated in the days after the conflict began.

Putin also told the CNN interviewer that the Georgian army was armed and trained for the conflict.

“Why hold years of difficult talks and seek complex compromise solutions in inter-ethnic conflicts? It’s easier to arm one side and push it into the murder of the other side, and it’s over,” he said.

“It seems like an easy solution. In reality it turns out that it’s not always so.”

Putin may have been referring to the military exercise Immediate Response 2008, which took place last month, involving no less than one thousand U.S. troops working with Georgian troops in a war game scenario. It was also well documented that Georgian troops were flown out of Iraq by the U.S. to join the conflict in South Ossetia. Aside from these facts, it is common knowledge that Washington provides training and equipment to the Georgian military, one of its coalition allies.

 

U.S. citizen was among Georgian commandos – Russian Military

Russia Today
August 29, 2008

A U.S. passport was found in a building in South Ossetia occupied by Georgian troops, a Russian military spokesperson revealed on Thursday. After Russian peacekeepers cleared the heavily defended building, a passport belonging to a Texan named Michael Lee White was discovered inside.

Deputy Chief of Russia’s General Staff Anatoly Nagovitsyn showed photocopies of the passport to media in a press briefing on Thursday.

“There is a building in Zemonekozi – a settlement to the south of Tskhinval that was fiercely defended by a Georgian special operations squad. Upon clearing the building, Russian peacekeepers recovered, among other documents, an American passport in the name of Michael Lee White of Texas,” said Nagovitsyn.

Neither the owner of the passport nor his remains were found at the scene, despite a thorough search.

“I do not know why he was there, but it is a fact that he was in the building, among Georgian special forces troops,” Nagovitsyn said.

The briefing was delivered on the same day Prime Minister Vladimir Putin told CNN, “We have serious reasons to believe that American citizens were right at the heart of the military action”. Putin said the conflict in South Ossetian may have been planned to benefit one of the U.S. presidential candidates.

 

Military help for Georgia is a ’declaration of war’, says Moscow

This is London
August 28, 2008

Moscow has issued an extraordinary warning to the West that military assistance to Georgia for use against South Ossetia or Abkhazia would be viewed as a “declaration of war” by Russia.

The extreme rhetoric from the Kremlin’s envoy to NATO came as President Dmitry Medvedev stressed he will make a military response to US missile defence installations in eastern Europe, sending new shudders across countries whose people were once blighted by the Iron Curtain.

And Moscow also emphasised it was closely monitoring what it claims is a build-up of NATO firepower in the Black Sea.

The incendiary warning on Western military involvement in Georgia – where NATO nations have long played a role in training and equipping the small state – came in an interview with Dmitry Rogozin, a former nationalist politician who is now ambassador to the North Atlantic Alliance.

“If NATO suddenly takes military actions against Abkhazia and South Ossetia, acting solely in support of Tbilisi, this will mean a declaration of war on Russia,” he stated.

Read Full Article Here

U.S. Expects to Rebuild Georgian Army
http://www.moscowtimes.ru/articles/detail.php?ID=370267

Russia: NATO interference in the caucasus means war
http://www.presstv.ir/detail.aspx?id=67757&sectionid=351020602

Putin accuses U.S. of orchestrating Georgian war
http://edition.cnn.com/2008/WO..ssia.georgia.cold.war/index.html

Russia threatens sale of offensive weapons to Israel’s enemies
http://www.worldtribune.com/worldtr..eu_russia0447_08_20.asp

 



Russian Parliament Votes to Recognize South Ossetia and Abkhazia
Russian Parliament Votes to Recognize South Ossetia and Abkhazia

Bloomberg
August 25, 2008

Both houses of the Russian parliament called on President Dmitry Medvedev to recognize the independence of two breakaway Georgian regions that sparked Russia’s first foreign military incursion since the Soviet era.

“Today we are faced with, I’m not afraid to say, a historic decision, to call upon the president of the Russian Federation to recognize the independence of South Ossetia and Abkhazia,” Sergei Mironov, the speaker of the upper house, said in an address to lawmakers in Moscow today.

South Ossetia and Abkhazia, which broke away from Georgia in wars in the early 1990s, have cited Kosovo’s Feb. 17 declaration of independence from Serbia as a precedent for their aspirations. Medvedev — who alone can decide on whether to recognize the territories — has said previously that Russia supports the regions’ decisions on their future status, while stopping short of formally recognizing them. President George W. Bush has insisted the regions remain a part of Georgia.

Both the lower chamber, the state Duma, and the upper house, the Federation Council, voted unanimously in support of independence.

“Medvedev will recognize both regions,” said Alexander Rahr, a Russia expert at the German Council on Foreign Relations in Berlin. “There’s no way out,” he said. “This is a consequence of the recognition of Kosovo by the West and Western policy in the Balkans.”

 

Upper chamber backs independence of Abkhazia and South Ossetia

Russia Today
August 25, 2008

Russia’s upper chamber of parliament has unanimously voted to ask the Russian President to recognise independence of Abkhazia and South Ossetia.

As the emergency session of the Federation Council began in Moscow, the presidents of the two breakaway republics have once again said they will never agree to remain within Georgia.

In his speech, the President of South Ossetia, Eduard Kokoity, said that both unrecognised states have more right to independence than Kosovo.

“As President of South Ossetia and on behalf of the South Ossetian parliament and its people, with all gratitude to the President of the Russian Federation I once again call for the recognition of South Ossetia as an independent state,” he said before the senators.

Abkhazian President Sergey Bagapsh, for his part, said neither Abkhazia nor South Ossetia will live as one state with Georgia.

Meanwhile, the Parliament’s lower chamber, the State Duma will most probably back the recognition of South Ossetia and Abkhazia, said Konstantin Zatulin, deputy head of the Duma Committee for International Affairs.

MPs have gathered to discuss draft appeals to the Russian President and the parliaments of UN member states in connection with Georgia’s military attack on South Ossetia.

In his address the Speaker of the Duma, Boris Gryzlov, called Georgia’s action a case of genocide and compared it to the aggression of Nazi Germany against the Soviet Union.

Even if Russia recognises Abkhazia and South Ossetia, the entire process will take a long time. There will be a need to decide what form their independence will take.

But if NATO makes a strong push to bring Georgia into the alliance, Russia will recognise both of them instantaneously, says RT’s political commentator Peter Lavelle.
Hard road to independence

South Ossetia, which borders Russia in the south Caucasus, and Abkhazia on the Black Sea had previously attempted to break away from Georgia following referendums which were overwhelmingly in favour of independence. The results were ignored by Tbilisi, which claimed the ethnic Georgians forced to flee the regions were not consulted. The recent conflict in South Ossetia has added further urgency to the demands for self-determination.

The roots of the current discord can be traced back to the divide and conquer policies of Joseph Stalin – himself half Georgian, half Ossetian. Before the 1917 revolution, the ethnic groups of the Caucasus all lived as separate subjects of the Russian empire. However, with the Bolsheviks came the redrawing of the map, with both South Ossetia and Abkhazia becoming parts of Georgia.

When the Soviet Union collapsed, the then Georgian leader Zviad Gamsakhurdia advocated a nationalist “Georgia for the Georgians” policy, re-opening old wounds. Two military conflicts followed, leaving thousands dead and forcing many more to flee the conflict zones.

The ceasefire in the early 1990s brought de-facto independence to both regions with the shaky truce maintained by peacekeeping forces of mainly Russian troops.

Russia has never recognised the independence of either republic, although Georgia has repeatedly accused Moscow of trying to annex its territory.

Since becoming president in 2004, Mikhail Saakashvili has pledged to bring his country closer to the West, which has also motivated his drive to end the territorial disputes.

Ossetians and Georgians have lived side by side for centuries. The two groups share Soviet history and the Orthodox Christian religion and intermarriage is common. But the ties that once bound their cultures have been severely damaged in the trauma of the recent fighting. Kosovo’s self-declared independence in February, too, has boosted these regions’ ambitions.

Most Abkhazians and South Ossetians carry Russian passports and the only valid currency is the Russian rouble. In addition, both self-declared republics have presidents, flags, national anthems, armies and Moscow’s support.

 



Captured map shows Georgia planned to invade Abkhazia

Captured map shows Georgia planned to invade Abkhazia

Russia Today
August 13, 2008

Russian troops have discovered what they believe are plans for an invasion of Abkhazia in a captured Georgian command post vehicle. On Wednesday, Abkhazian armed forces succeeded in pushing Georgian troops out of the Upper Kodori Gorge in anticipation of such an attack.

For the past few days the spotlight has been on Georgia’s other breakaway republic, South Ossetia.

But the captured documents apparently outline steps for the invasion of Abkhazia, a region twice the size of South Ossetia, bordering the Black Sea.

 

Russia accuses of Georgia of plotting attack against Abhkazia

RIA Novosti
August 13, 2008

Georgia’s criticism of the deployment of Russian peacekeepers to Abkhazia was slammed Wednesday by Moscow, which called Tbilisi’s declaration that Russian troops were occupying its breakaway region an attempt to plot an armed attack against Abkhazia.

“If [Georgian President Mikheil] Saakashvili’s absurd demand that the peacekeeping operation be halted in Abkhazia is implemented, the region will risk being plunged deeper into crisis by the unhealthy ambitions of the incumbent Georgian authorities,” the Russian Foreign Ministry said in a statement.

The ministry said Russia would continue its peacekeeping missions in Abkhazia and South Ossetia.

The ministry added that the Collective Peacekeeping Forces of the Commonwealth of Independent States were deployed in the region not only with the consent of Georgia, but Abkhazia as well. This was fixed in the Agreement on a Ceasefire and Separation of Forces, signed in Moscow in 1994. The ministry said the decision by CIS heads of state on the use of peacekeepers directly referred to a request from Abkhazia for this.

“Considering this, we think it impossible to resolve the fate of the peacekeeping operation without taking into account the opinion of the Abkhazian side,” the ministry said adding that the whole architecture of the Georgian-Abkhazian settlement scheme would be disrupted otherwise.

Russian peacekeepers have been deployed in Abkhazia as part of the CIS Collective Peacekeeping Forces since the 1990s, following a bloody conflict triggered by Abkhazia’s bid for independence from Georgia.

After Friday’s attempt by the Georgian military to regain control of South Ossetia and the subsequent expulsion of Georgian troops from the region, Russia has committed more than 9,000 paratroopers and 350 armored vehicles to Abkhazia in an attempt to prevent the South Ossetian conflict spreading, and to guard against a potential Georgian attack on Abkhazia.

 



Jon Stewart Mocks Bush, McCain & Condi for Scolding Russia

Jon Stewart Mocks Bush, McCain & Condi for Scolding Russia

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EclJB4RrJdM

 



Turkey President: A New World Order Should Emerge

Turkey President: A New World Order Should Emerge

Andrew McLemore
Raw Story
August 16, 2008

For controversial Turkish President Abdullah Gül, the recent war in Georgia signals a “new world order” that will emerge from the rubble of South Ossetia and force the United States to share its power, The Guardian reported.

Gül said America’s inability to prevent Russia’s invasion shows that the US can no longer shape world politics as it once did.

“I don’t think you can control all the world from one centre,” Gül said. “There are big nations. There are huge populations. There is unbelievable economic development in some parts of the world. So what we have to do is, instead of unilateral actions, act all together, make common decisions and have consultations with the world. A new world order, if I can say it, should emerge.”

The geopolitical turmoil in the Caucusus — a region between Europe and Asia that includes the nations of Georgia and Turkey — has placed Turkey in a difficult position between pleasing its neighbor Russia and not hurting its relationship with the US.

The conflict in Georgia proved Turkey’s tenuous position regarding energy when Russian tanks cut the flow of oil to Turkey from a pipeline running through Georgia, Reuters reported.

Turkey’s energy problems have forced it to seek gas from Russia and Iran, prompting an outcry from Washington.

Gül spoke to The Guardian shortly before a meeting with Iran’s President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.

The US warned Turkey on Thursday against striking an energy deal with Iran after learning of the two presidents’ meeting, Financial Times reported.

US officials claim the deal will undermine international efforts to curb Iran’s nuclear program.

“Such a deal by Turkey with Iran would send the wrong message at a time when the Iranian regime has repeatedly failed to comply with its UN Security Council and IAEA obligations,” the US state department said.

Gül said he doesn’t want Iran to have nuclear weapons, but he “doesn’t want to think about” the United States attack on Iran.

“I don’t want to think about that. Everybody should take a lesson from what happened in Iraq,” he said. “Diplomatic solutions are always better than hard solutions.”