noworldsystem.com


Mass burial site in Tripoli

Mass burial site in Tripoli

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B8ICz-D6wNo

 



Libya Airforce Jets Bombing Protesters

Libya Airforce Jets Bombing Protesters


Disturbing reports reveal that the Gadafi Regime is using fighter jets to suppress protests in Tripoli.

Libyan military aircraft fired live ammunition at crowds of anti-government protesters in Tripoli, Al Jazeera television reported on Monday, quoting witnesses for its information.

“What we are witnessing today is unimaginable. Warplanes and helicopters are indiscriminately bombing one area after another. There are many, many dead,” Adel Mohamed Saleh said.

Saleh, who called himself a political activist, said the bombings had initially targeted a funeral procession.

“Our people are dying. It is the policy of scorched earth.” he said. “Every 20 minutes they are bombing.”

Asked if the attacks were still happening he said: “It is continuing, it is continuing. Anyone who moves, even if they are in their car they will hit you.”

No independent verification of the report was immediately available.

The protesters were reportedly heading to the army base to obtain ammunition of their own, but witnesses said the air force bombed the demonstrators before they could get there.

Read Full Article Here

 

Jet pilots seek refuge in Malta after refusing criminal orders to bomb civilians

Activist Post
February 21, 2011

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cJ39XKk710k

Al Jazeera have confirmed reports that fighter jets are being used against civilians in Tripoli. So far today, 61 fatalities have been confirmed in the western city, and the death toll is definitely going to rise rapidly with the use of such military hardware.

Meanwhile, two military jets from Libya have landed in Malta – It is possible that the pilots have flown over to Malta in order to defect rather than obey such illegal and criminal orders. The truth of this matter will come out soon enough.

Both the governments of the European Union and the United States have failed to condemn the actions of the Gaddafi administration strongly enough. The United Nations are also suffering from a dire case of inaction in the face of genocide despite firm international laws which state that it is the duty of all nations to intervene during a genocide in order to stop it – with military force.

The Egypt / Libyan border is in the control of the uprising’s forces and open on their side, yet the Egyptian military refuses to allow aid convoys over the border and into the relatively safer regions in the east of Libya, much to the disgust of activists in Egypt who have worked hard to collect aid for their Libyan brothers and sisters.

 

Libyan FM official vows to kill himself if military strike on protesters is true

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=607btsXpX3E

Libya defectors: Pilots told to bomb protesters flee to Malta

Libya: ‘more than 1000 dead’

Libyan Soldiers Found Executed After Refusing To Kill Protesters

 



Chinese Protesting Lawless Dictatorship in China

Chinese Protesting Lawless Dictatorship in China

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c6OvvKBgHm8

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dzKsqw8u2v4

China rounds up 100 activists to rapidly quash pro-democracy ‘Jasmine Revolution’ organised online

 



For US, more at stake in Bahrain than base alone

For US, more at stake in Bahrain than base alone

AFP
February 20, 2011

As political unrest shakes its tiny Gulf ally Bahrain, much more is at stake for the United States than just the fate of the US Fifth Fleet’s base, analysts said.

Also in play are Washington’s extensive strategic ties with Bahrain’s influential oil-rich neighbor Saudi Arabia and efforts by US arch-foe Iran to spread its influence from across the Gulf, they said.

In many ways, the unrest in Bahrain “is much more dangerous” for the US than the current state of affairs in Egypt, more than a week after mass protests forced president Hosni Mubarak to step down, said analyst Aaron David Miller.

To be sure, Egypt has greater weight than Bahrain, said Miller, a former State Department analyst and negotiator who is now an analyst with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.

It is the largest and most powerful Arab state, has a peace treaty with Israel and receives $1.3 billion in US military aid each year.

And the Egyptian-US alliance remains intact, at least for now.

However, Bahrain’s vulnerability “to more convulsive change and the impact that it could have vis-a-vis Arab policy for Iran, Saudi Arabia and the rest of the Gulf makes it … a more hot-button issue right now,” Miller told AFP.

The Sunni Arab leaders of Bahrain and Saudi Arabia, who govern over restive Shiite Arab populations near Shiite but non-Arab Iran, fear Washington’s push for reform will sow greater instability, said analyst Patrick Clawson.

They strongly opposed Washington’s pressure on Egypt for a transition to democracy to ease out Mubarak, according to Clawson, deputy director for research at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.

“The perception in the (Gulf) region is that democracy means either the complete chaos you had in Iraq or else the stasis and bickering you had in Kuwait,” he said.

And if needed, the Saudis may be prepared to repeat their intervention in Bahrain in the 1990s, when they sent armored personnel carriers across the causeway linking the neighbors.

“So the Saudis are in a position to ensure that things don’t get out of hand in Bahrain and they are of a mind to do that. That is a powerful constraint to what the United States can do under these circumstances,” Clawson said.

The course of events could put a strain on the US-Saudi strategic relationship, which involves US military bases and billions of dollars in US weapons sales, as well as close cooperation on regional diplomacy and counter-terrorism.

Bahrain, fearing Iran’s meddling, may continue taking a tough line toward unrest, although Bahraini security forces withdrew Saturday from a Manama square that had been the focal point of bloody anti-regime protests.

The implications of the apparently conciliatory move were not immediately clear.

“The Gulf rulers will be petrified that there is an Iranian influence in all of this, but I think the Iranians will be pretty incompetent” in trying to gain influence in the region, Clawson said, noting that will not prevent them from making a “good attempt” to do so.

What’s more, he said, Arab Shiites increasingly look to their own leaders rather than Iran for guidance.

Nonetheless, analysts expressed concern about Iran.

“The issue of Iran is critical. What is a good outcome for us?” Miller asked.

“Here you have Iranian access to that Shia majority. You could argue that an Iraq-like outcome is not out of the question,” he continued, referring to how Shiites now dominate affairs in Baghdad with some backed by Iran.

Michelle Dunne, a former Middle East specialist at the State Department, agreed that the Saudis would have a hard time accepting political change in Bahrain and that the Iranians would try to exploit instability there.

“The Bahraini problem is definitely a home-grown problem,” said Dunne, now a senior associate with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

“This is not Iran manipulating the politics of an Arab state, but the Bahraini Shia are desperate. They will accept support from where they can get it.”

As for the naval base, analysts said its presence is not currently the focus of Shiite-driven protests, though it could develop as such if protesters eventually succeed in changing the government.

“At some point, that’s going to be rethought… whether it’s appropriate to have a US naval base there or not,” said Dunne.

Anthony Cordesman, a former Defense Department intelligence analyst, said the US base in Bahrain is “very important” in light of the “steady buildup” by the naval branch of Iran’s Revolutionary Guards over the past decade.

 



Libya protests death toll close to 300

Libya protests death toll close to 300

Press TV
Feb 20, 2011

WARNING: Extremely Graphic Content

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Wow47cU1Jk

Latest figures show the death toll from clashes in Libya’s massive popular uprising against long-time ruler Muammar Gaddafi is nearing 300.

Reports have put the number of people killed in the country’s second largest city, Benghazi at more than 200 over the past days.

Hospital officials, however, estimate that the countrywide death toll may be close to 300, with at least 20 protesters killed overnight.

According to witnesses, snipers fired on protestors while security forces opened up with heavy weapons.

Doctors in Benghazi say most of those injured sustained gunshot wounds.

The Libyan government is opening fire from helicopters to crack down on pro-democracy protesters as nationwide protests continue to shake the foundation of the Gaddafi regime.

Protesters have been demanding the ouster of the Libyan leader, who has been in power for over 40 years.

 

Gaddafi’s Son: “We will keep fighting [protesters] until the last man standing”

Reuters
February 21, 2011

Libyan strongman Muammar Gaddafi will fight a popular revolt to “the last man standing,” one of his sons said on Monday as people in the capital joined protests for the first time after days of violent unrest in the eastern city of Benghazi.

Anti-government protesters rallied in Tripoli’s streets, tribal leaders spoke out against Gaddafi, and army units defected to the opposition as oil exporter Libya endured one of the bloodiest revolts to convulse the Arab world.

Gaddafi’s son Saif al-Islam Gaddafi appeared on national television in an attempt to both threaten and calm people, saying the army would enforce security at any price.

“Our spirits are high and the leader Muammar Gaddafi is leading the battle in Tripoli, and we are behind him as is the Libyan army,” he said.

“We will keep fighting until the last man standing, even to the last woman standing…We will not leave Libya to the Italians or the Turks.”

Wagging a finger at the camera, he blamed Libyan exiles for fomenting the violence. But he also promised dialogue on reforms and wage rises.

The cajoling may not be enough to douse the anger unleashed after four decades of rule by Gaddafi — mirroring events in Egypt where a popular revolt overthrew the seemingly impregnable President Hosni Mubarak 10 days ago.

In the coastal city of Benghazi protesters appeared to be largely in control after forcing troops and police to retreat to a compound. Government buildings were set ablaze and ransacked.

In the first sign of serious unrest in the capital, thousands of protesters clashed with Gaddafi supporters. Gunfire rang out in the night and police used tear gas to disperse demonstrators, some of whom threw stones at Gaddafi billboards.

Read Full Article Here

 



Iran Executing Protesters to Discourage New Uprising

Iran Executing Protesters to Discourage New Uprising

Daily Beast
February 5, 2011

As political unrest shakes Egypt, the Iranian government has quietly hanged at least 73 people in recent weeks in what may be an effort to discourage new uprisings in Tehran. Omid Memarian and Roja Heydarpour on the secret prisons and brewing backlash.

As protests sweep the Middle East, the Iranian government has launched a brutal wave of executions in what many see as an intimidation tactic aimed at discouraging fresh uprisings.

During the month of January, Iran executed at least 73 people, an average of two to three hangings each day. The numbers are alarming, even in a country second only to China for the most executions in the world.

The killings have sent a bone chilling message to members of Iran’s pro-democracy Green Movement about the deadly risks of following the lead of frustrated citizens in Egypt, Tunisia and Yemen. Many of those executed in Iran in recent weeks were political prisoners originally rounded up during the protests that swept Tehran in 2009, after the alleged fraudulent election of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.

“The executions, for those who live in close quarters with death-row inmates, have dealt a severe emotional blow,” said a family member of a political prisoner in Farsi.

The hanging of a Dutch-Iranian prisoner, Zahra Bahrami, last week was particularly shattering for the inmates, according to the family member. Bahrami’s hanging sparked outcry from the international community, though drowned by the massive uprisings in the region. She was initially arrested for participating in the protests in 2009, but was later charged with possessing 400 grams of cocaine and opium—a crime punishable by death.

Her fellow inmates knew she was originally a political prisoner. They also knew that she had been severely tortured. So the news of her execution was particularly shocking.

Since the uprising in Iran two years ago, the green movement has been largely silenced with extreme violence and intimidation that reportedly includes secret prisons and hangings without due process. Those demonstrations led to more than 5,000 prisoners, dozens of murdered protesters, and several prisoners who died from torture.

And as the anniversary of the Iranian Revolution in 1979 approaches next week, the government fears the day will be used by organizers for more protests. The regime uses the day to tout the triumph of Islam over a despotic regime. But the people can tout it as a remembrance of overthrowing a despised and brutal authority.

In the month of January alone, close to 100 executions took place inside the Iranian prisons, according to various sources. According to Iranian media accounts, the number is between 66 and 73—but activists and journalists believe it to be even more.

“We know that other executions take place…no newspaper would dare to challenge the government statistics and information,” said a Tehran-based journalist on the condition of anonymity. “Talking about the executions is very much like debating the nuclear issue or criticizing Ahmadinejad—they are all considered security issues and this could have serious repercussions for journalists or papers.”

The Iranian government claims that most of those executed had charges related to drug trafficking or trade, but there are political prisoners among them. During the past few weeks, at least three political prisoners were hanged, two of whom had been arrested during the post-election protests.

A large number of executions are reportedly taking place in secret in Vakilabad prison in Mashad, one of the holiest cities in Shi’ite Islam, according to the International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran.

Five hundred miles east of Tehran, there are allegedly dozens, if not hundreds of prisoners, hanged outside the prison—without due process, and completely hidden from the eyes of the international community.

And as news of the rash of executions continues to spread among the population, people are showing signs of utter disgust, according to an activist in Iran who helps international human rights organizations gather data.

“Iran’s economic crisis coupled with its crisis of legitimacy is all reaching a pivotal point,” said a human rights activist on the condition of anonymity for fear of political repercussions.

He believes that there will be a “bread uprising” akin to those in Tunisia in Egypt as the economic conditions inside the country worsen. And the people first hit by a crumbling economy are the poor, which stirs anxiety inside the regime about revolt, he said.

So the execution of political activists intimidates protestors, while execution of ordinary citizens for drug trafficking, intimidates the poor.

These executions as an intimidation tool can, of course, backfire.

If the poorer, rural people and the educated middle class find common ground, violence will eventually be met with violence, he said.

To confound the problem, there has not been a UN human rights monitor in Iran since 2002.

Just last week, two UN independent experts warned that there has been a dramatic surge in death sentences in Iran carried out, in the absence of internationally recognized safeguards, despite numerous calls by the UN to immediately halt executions.

“We call on the Iranian Government to immediately declare a moratorium on the death penalty in view of the gravity of the situation…” said the UN Special Rapporteur Christof Heyns last week. “Any death sentence undertaken in contravention of a Government’s international obligations is tantamount to an arbitrary execution,” he said.

US Embassy Van Plows Through Cairo Protesters

Iranian Protesters Lynched by Police

Police Van Running Over Iranian Protesters

 



Shoes and Eggs Thrown at Tony Blair

Shoes and Eggs Thrown at Tony Blair

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jh21PnBgILU