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Internet ‘Kill Switch’ called ‘Internet Freedom’ bill

Internet ‘Kill Switch’ called ‘Internet Freedom’ bill

I love it how the scum in Washington D.C. like to use doublespeak like ‘freedom’ and ‘patriot’ in draconian legislation like this, again more propaganda against the masses to accept their own lobotomy.

    A Senate proposal that has become known as the Internet “kill switch” bill was reintroduced this week, with a tweak its backers say eliminates the possibility of an Egypt-style disconnection happening in the United States.

    As CNET reported last month, the 221-page bill hands Homeland Security the power to issue decrees to certain privately owned computer systems after the president declares a “national cyberemergency.” A section in the new bill notes that does not include “the authority to shut down the Internet,” and the name of the bill has been changed to include the phrase “Internet freedom.”

    “The emergency measures in our bill apply in a precise and targeted way only to our most critical infrastructure,” Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) said yesterday about the legislation she is sponsoring with Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn). “We cannot afford to wait for a cyber 9/11 before our government finally realizes the importance of protecting our digital resources.” Source

Feds Wrongly Link 84,000 Seized Sites to Child Porn

 



New Big Brother Toy: Nanobot Hummingbird

New Big Brother Toy: Nanobot Hummingbird

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=96WePgcg37I

 



Armed Agent Slips Past TSA Body Scanner

Armed Agent Slips Past TSA Body Scanner

NBC
February 18, 2011

An undercover TSA agent was able to get through security at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport with a handgun during testing of the enhanced-imaging body scanners, according to a high-ranking, inside source at the Transportation Security Administration.

The source said the undercover agent carried a pistol in her undergarments when she put the body scanners to the test. The officer successfully made it through the airport’s body scanners every time she tried, the source said.

“In this case, where they had a test, and it was just a dismal failure as I’m told,” said Larry Wansley, former head of security at American Airlines. “As I’ve heard (it), you got a problem, especially with a fire arm.”

Wansley said covert testing by the TSA is commonplace — although failing should be rare.

The TSA insider who blew the whistle on the test also said that none of the TSA agents who failed to spot the gun on the scanned image were disciplined. The source said the agents continue to work the body scanners today.

Wansley said that is a problem.

“This was only a test, but it’s critically important that you do something, because if that person failed in the real environment, then you have a problem,” he said.

The TSA did not deny that the tests took place or the what the results were.

The agency would only provide the following statement:

    “Our security officers are one of the most heavily tested federal workforces in the nation. We regularly test our officers in a variety of ways to ensure the effectiveness of our technology, security measures and the overall layered system. For security reasons, we do not publicize or comment on the results of covert tests, however advanced imaging technology is an effective tool to detect both metallic and nonmetallic items hidden on passengers.”

TSA agents who spoke to a reporter agreed that the body-imaging scanners are effective — but only if the officers monitoring them are paying attention.

Are planned airport scanners just a scam?

 



PATRIOT ACT extension passes Senate

PATRIOT ACT extension passes Senate, heads to Obama’s desk

United Liberty
February 16, 2011

A day after the House passed a short-term extension of the USA PATRIOT act, the Senate followed suit, passing the controversial without much opposition:

    The Senate on Tuesday overwhelmingly passed a bill that would extend through May three key provisions of the Patriot Act that are set to expire later this month. The move is designed to buy time for lawmakers to fully debate and hold hearings on the controversial counterterrorism surveillance law.

    The bill passed on an 86-to-12-vote, with two senators not voting. Most lawmakers from both parties voted in favor of the measure, but the opposition was also bipartisan; among the dozen lawmakers voting against it were nine Democrats, two Republicans and one independent.
    […]
    The Senate had been considering several different proposals that would have extended the Patriot Act provisions permanently or through 2013. But given the time constraints — both chambers are in recess next week — Senate leaders agreed to a short-term extension through May 27 to give Congress more time to work toward a longer-term reauthorization.

    On the Senate floor Tuesday evening, Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), who had already announced his opposition to extending the Patriot Act provisions, denounced the law as an infringement of civil liberties.

    “Now we have essentially government agents, akin to soldiers, writing warrants; it’s ripe for abuse,” said Paul, a libertarian-leaning freshman and the son of one of the Patriot Act’s most outspoken critics, Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas).

The extension will now head to President Barack Obama’s desk. Members of Congress will hold hearings on the PATRIOT Act, a law that has documented abuses by federal authorities.

The only Republicans to vote against extension were Rand Paul (R-KY) and Mike Lee (R-UT), both freshman. Paul announced his opposition to the PATRIOT Act a few days in advance of the vote. He also recorded this video explaining his vote:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZSDBswx90Cs

 



Woman sues after genitals were groped by TSA

Woman sues after genitals were groped by TSA

Daily Mail
February 11, 2011

A woman who claims to have been strip searched and aggressively groped for not declaring she was carrying raspberries across the border is suing U.S. authorities.

Loretta Van Beek, an interior designer, from Ontario, was travelling home from Georgia when she was sent for a secondary inspection in a windowless room.

The 46-year-old said the two female agents ordered her to strip and told her they were ‘about to get intimate’.

One agent then ‘aggressively groped her breasts and genital area’ for an extended period of time while the other one watched, it is alleged, before she was photographed, fingerprinted and sent back to Canada.

One agent then ‘aggressively groped her breasts and genital area’ for an extended period of time while the other one watched, it is alleged, before she was photographed, fingerprinted and sent back to Canada.

She was in the room with the agents for two hours.

The incident, which happened at the Ambassador Bridge last March, was heard in the U.S. District Court in Detroit on Wednesday.

The woman’s lawyer, S. Thomas Wienner, said his client was traumatised by the incident and wanted to find out if there had been other victims.

He told MailOnline: ‘Even after all this time she still feels traumatised about what happened and is still very upset about the experience.

‘We also have reason to believe that she is not the only person this has happened to.’

He said Ms Van Beek had no criminal record and had never encountered such treatment when crossing the border before on her frequent trips to Georgia.

She is suing for violation of the fourth amendment which protects people against unreasonable search and seizure.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection said it couldn’t comment on pending litigation.

Ms Van Beek’s case follows months of nation-wide outrage over the Transportation Security Administration’s (TSA) enhanced pat-down searches at airports.

It has been alleged airport staff are being more vigorous and intrusive in an effort to force more people to go through the full-body scanners.

More and more cases of security workers groping men and women, fondling children, and interrogating passengers emerge every week and a nation-wide bid to boycott the full-body scanners has been launched.

TSA: “Hey, I thought she was mine! I was gonna do her!”

Can Jesse Ventura Force a TSA Submission?

TSA PUTTING HANDS DOWN YOUR PANTS

TSA Airport Security Touching Children ‘s Genitals

 



GPS in Cameras Can Track Where a Photo is Taken
February 10, 2011, 12:32 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , ,

GPS in Cameras and Phones Can Track Where a Photo is Taken

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5E8Yw89EDf0

 



Justice Department wants all web surfing tracked

Justice Department seeks to have all web surfing tracked

Raw Story
January 25, 2011

The US Justice Department wants Internet service providers and cell phone companies to be required to hold on to records for longer to help with criminal prosecutions.

“Data retention is fundamental to the department’s work in investigating and prosecuting almost every type of crime,” US deputy assistant attorney general Jason Weinstein told a congressional subcommittee on Tuesday.

“Some records are kept for weeks or months; others are stored very briefly before being purged,” Weinstein said in remarks prepared for delivery to the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism and Homeland Security.

He said Internet records are often “the only available evidence that allows us to investigate who committed crimes on the Internet.”

Internet and phone records can be “crucial evidence” in a wide array of cases, including child exploitation, violent crime, fraud, terrorism, public corruption, drug trafficking, online piracy and computer hacking, Weinstein said, but only if the data still exists when law enforcement needs it.

“In some ways, the problem of investigations being stymied by a lack of data retention is growing worse,” he told lawmakers.

Weinstein noted inconsistencies in data retention, with one mid-sized cell phone company not keeping records, a cable Internet provider not tracking the Internet protocol addresses it assigns to customers and another only keeping them for seven days.

Law enforcement is hampered by a “legal regime that does not require providers to retain non-content data for any period of time” while investigators must request records on a case-by-case basis through the courts, he said.

“The investigator must realize he needs the records before the provider deletes them, but providers are free to delete records after a short period of time, or to destroy them immediately,” Weinstein added.

The justice official said greater data retention requirements raise legitimate privacy concerns but “any privacy concerns about data retention should be balanced against the needs of law enforcement to keep the public safe.”

John Morris, general counsel at the non-profit Center for Democracy & Technology, said mandatory data retention “raises serious privacy and free speech concerns.”

“A key to protecting privacy is to minimize the amount of data collected and held by ISPs and online companies in the first place,” he said.

“Mandatory data retention laws would require companies to maintain large databases of subscribers’ personal information, which would be vulnerable to hackers, accidental disclosure, and government or other third party access.”

Kate Dean, executive director of the Internet Service Provider Association, said broad mandatory data retention requirements would be “fraught with legal, technical and practical challenges.”

Dean said they would require “an entire industry to retain billions of discrete electronic records due to the possibility that a tiny percentage of them might contain evidence related to a crime.”

“We think that it is important to weigh that potential value against the impact on the millions of innocent Internet users’ privacy,” she said.