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Dodd Bill KILLS Jobs, Creates Permanent Bailout

Dodd Bill KILLS Jobs, Creates Permanent Bailout

NoWorldSystem.com
April 21, 2010

Today, Obama promoted another government takeover bill, this time the financial sector is the target. The bill is basically a sweetheart deal for the banking industry, much like how ObamaCare was a bailout for the insurance companies. The 1,408 page bill includes many provisions like the creation of a permanent and unlimited bailout authority for Wall Street and has the potential for making it difficult for small businesses to succeed.

Obama claims the bill will “put a stop to tax-payer-funded bailouts” when in reality the bill will create a permanent and unlimited bailout mechanism for the big banks and companies that are ‘too big to fail’. “If you liked the bailouts in 2008, you’ll love the Dodd bill,” said Republican Senator David Vitter. “Congressional Democrats and the Obama Administration want to create a permanent bailout mechanism all while spouting their rhetoric of getting tough on Wall Street, but if you look at who is already lining up to support their ‘reform’ measure it’s a who’s who of the big banks that have already received the taxpayer bailout the first time.”

Democrat Congressman Brad Sherman agrees: “There are serious problems with the Dodd bill. The Dodd bill has unlimited executive bailout authority. That’s something Wall Street desperately wants but doesn’t dare ask for.”

The rhetoric by Obama today is just another example of how he slaps the hands of Wall Street to only make sure they prosper on tax-payer-funded bailouts by giving them complete authority. Not only that, but this bill will break the back of small business by placing restrictions on venture capital investing making it harder for small startup businesses to succeed.

Here are a few quotes from a Venture Beat article:

    “First, Dodd’s bill would require startups raising funding to register with the Securities and Exchange Commission, and then wait 120 days for the SEC to review their filing. A second provision raises the wealth requirements for an “accredited investor” who can invest in startups – if the bill passes, investors would need assets of more than $2.3 million (up from $1 million) or income of more than $450,000 (up from $250,000). The third restriction removes the federal pre-emption allowing angel and venture financing in the United States to follow federal regulations, rather than face different rules between states.”

    “Obviously, I’m deeply concerned about Senator Dodd’s proposal to place these restrictions on angel investing. I think angel investing is undeniably one of the largest engines for job creation as well as innovation and competitiveness on the global scale for the United States. There’s no doubt about it that the restrictions that he’s proposing would absolutely chill investing.

    “Specifically, one of the things we need to take into account is while 10 years ago it may have taken years to build a company, companies are now built in a matter of weeks. So this 120-day waiting period is frankly ridiculous. I have companies with tens of thousands and hundreds of thousands of users that are built in a matter of weeks. They’re generating actual dollars of revenue, creating jobs, investing in real estate office space, capital equipment, etc. If they had to wait 120 days to actually apply for the ability to obtain financing it would absolutely just crush that market.”

Obama is one of the biggest puppets for Wall Street, despite all the rhetoric he uses against them. Obama’s greatest allies are the big banks and most of his important constituents are wall street financiers. In 2008, Obama’s campaign was mostly funded by Wall Street, banks like AIG, JPMorgan and Goldman Sachs all played a major financial role for his presidency taking in $15 million from securities and investment firms, $3 million from commercial banks, and $6 million from other financial institutions.

Obama and the Democrats in Congress will try to rush this bill in before the American people have the chance to find out what’s in it. Just like ObamaCare, they will use non-transparent and secretive tactics to make sure it becomes law. The bill is likely to hit the floor of the Senate as early as next week.

The Dodd Bill Will Kill America’s Job Creation Engine

Why The Dodd Finance Bill Is Bad For America

Is Goldman Obama’s Enron? No, it’s worse

Will Obama Return $994,795 In Goldman Sachs Campaign Contributions?

Obama Now Pushing Sneaky Wall Street Bailout

Obama-Dodd financial bill would further enrich Goldman Sachs

Geithner ‘very confident’ US finance reform will pass

Obama Claims He’s Not a Puppet for Big Banks

 



Obama’s Stimulus Bill Will Be Called a ‘Jobs Bill’

Congressman: “We’re told not to call it another stimulus bill, we’re calling it a jobs bill”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eEyqf3yoKsk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NYlrDESEZ5E

 

We must spend out way out of recession (and into DEBT)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0JNHj2sP-Y0

Government Uses Stimulus Money To Buy Naked Body Scanners

Senate sends $1.1 trillion spending bill to Obama

$5,500 Golf Cart Tax Credit in Obama Stimulus Bill

 



Schiff: No Economic Recovery in 2010

Schiff: No Economic Recovery in 2010

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DWDD3lTWv9w

 



U.S. Cities Turning Into Ghost Towns

U.S. Cities Turning Into Ghost Towns

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kAEuix0SD-M

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XmFzgWn-tYA

 



No Jobs for The Next Ten Years?

No Jobs for The Next Ten Years?

Daily Bell
December 30, 2009

The decade ahead could be a brutal one for America’s unemployed – and for people with jobs hoping for pay raises. At best, it could take until the middle of the decade for the nation to generate enough jobs to drive down the unemployment rate to a normal 5 or 6 percent and keep it there. At worst, that won’t happen until much later – perhaps not until the next decade. The deepest and most enduring recession since the 1930s has battered America’s work force. The unemployed number 15.4 million. The jobless rate is 10 percent. More than 7 million jobs have vanished. People out of work at least six months number a record 5.9 million. And household income, adjusted for inflation, has shrunk in the past decade. Most economists say it could take until at least until 2015 for the unemployment rate to drop down to a historically more normal 5.5 percent. And with the job market likely to stay weak, some also foresee another decade of wage stagnation. Even though the economy will likely keep growing, the pace is expected to be plodding. That will make employers reluctant to hire. Further contributing to high unemployment is the likelihood of more people competing for jobs, baby boomers delaying retirement and interest rates edging higher. All this would come after a decade that created relatively few jobs: a net total of just 464,000. By contrast, 21.7 million new jobs were generated between 1989 and 1999. – Huffington Post

Dominant Social Theme: It’s looking grim?

Free-Market Analysis: There are a lot of statistics cited in this article but like many articles with a mainstream tone, most of them are besides-the-point or shed little illumination about what is going on. First of all the jobless rate in America is closer to 20-30 percent, we figure, when you throw in everyone who wants to work but can’t find work, even part-time work. And second, we distrust the other unemployment figures cited in this article. Finally, we look in vain for a reason as to why all this is happening. Can we find it somewhere else in the body of the article? Here’s some more:

That’s mainly because the economy’s recovery, sluggish by historical standards, isn’t expected to regain its vigor over the next few years. As a result, companies will be in no rush to ramp up hiring. Other analysts think the economy will recover the jobs wiped out by the recession by 2013 or 2014 but that the unemployment rate will stay high. They note that the healing economy will cause more people to stream back into the labor force, vying for too-few jobs.

In addition, baby boomers whose retirement accounts have shrunk could put off retiring and stay in the work force longer. That would leave fewer positions available for the unemployed. Other contributing forces – businesses squeezing more work from employees they still have and relying more on part-time and overseas help – have intensified. And record-high federal budget deficits and the threat of inflation could drive up interest rates, which could hobble growth and restrict job creation. All those factors could combine to keep unemployment high.

“It will be the mother of all jobless recoveries,” predicts economic historian John Steel Gordon. On the other hand, it’s possible some technological innovation not yet envisioned could generate a wave of jobs. Yet at the moment, most economists aren’t betting that any such breakthroughs will rescue the labor market.

The last time the jobless rate reached double digits, in the early 1980s, it took six years to bring it down to normal levels.
Unemployment hit a post-World War II high of 10.8 percent at the end of 1982 as the country was emerging from a severe recession. The rate fell to around 5 percent in 1988. It took less than two years for the number of jobs to return to its pre-recession level. In this recovery, the economy is far more fragile. Hard-to-get credit is exerting a drag. Wounds from the banking system’s worst crisis since the Great Depression will take years to fully heal. People and companies, scarred by the crisis, are likely to restrain borrowing, spending and investing.

From our perspective this article does what all such articles do, it describes what’s going on without explaining anything. You can read the whole article, and you’ll never come up with a reason why 20 percent or more of America is unemployed. Is it because people are lazy? They don’t want jobs even though they pretend they do?

We would write the article differently. We would start by explaining that for the past 100 years America’s manufacturing might has been disintegrating even though the country has looked relatively healthy. But the combination of the income tax and central banking, introduced in the ‘teens, has robbed the country of its industrial muscle. Many big companies have moved away rather than be subject to the income tax. And employees have given up productive trade and agricultural jobs to chase after the latest Fed-stimulated bubble. The tech sector looked attractive in the 1990s, and the mortgage business was great during the 2000s. But neither business lasted because they weren’t real. They were the chaff of central bank monetary stimulation.

The income tax and central banking have hollowed out American industrial capacity. This is the reason that jobs will not return to America – and the world – for a long time. It wasn’t enough by the way that all this happened over a period of nearly 100 years now, but every time there’s a cyclical bust, the West stimulates – throws good money after bad that only prolongs the agony by confusing the market signals that the economy would otherwise present to rational investors.

Conclusion: Deprived of market signals, investors have a hard time determining what’s an efficient business and what is not. They’ve decided, with considerable reason, that too-big-too-fail banks are probably a good investment. Well, this may be so, but it does nothing for the larger economy. Putting good money after bad into these large fiat-money sinkholes only retards real innovation and sets the economy up for another bout of inflationary bleeding and boom-bust madness. What’s needed is a return to a private market gold-and-silver standard that will provide real feedback to those who want to purchase equity in winning entrepreneurial companies. See, it’s not hard to explain, but for some reason, the story just doesn’t get told, certainly not in the mainstream press.

 



U.S. Halfway to Depression Level

U.S. Halfway to Depression Level
ShadowStats.com founder John Williams explains the risk of hyperinflation. Worst-case scenario? Rioting in the streets and devolution to a bartering system.

Fairfield Weekly
December 31, 2009

Do you believe everything the government tells you? Economist and statistician John Williams sure doesn’t. Williams, who has consulted for individuals and Fortune 500 companies, now uncovers the truth behind the U.S. government’s economic numbers on his Web site at ShadowStats.com. Williams says, over the last several decades, the feds have been infusing their data with optimistic biases to make the economy seem far rosier than it really is. His site reruns the numbers using the original methodology. What he found was not good.

Maymin: So we are technically bankrupt?

Williams: Yes, and when countries are in that state, what they usually do is rev up the printing presses and print the money they need to meet their obligations. And that creates inflation, hyperinflation, and makes the currency worthless.

Obama says America will go bankrupt if Congress doesn’t pass the health care bill.

Well, it’s going to go bankrupt if they do pass the health care bill, too, but at least he’s thinking about it. He talks about it publicly, which is one thing prior administrations refused to do. Give him credit for that. But what he’s setting up with this health care system will just accelerate the process.

Where are we right now?

In terms of the GDP, we are about halfway to depression level. If you look at retail sales, industrial production, we are already well into depressionary. If you look at things such as the housing industry, the new orders for durable goods we are in Great Depression territory. If we have hyperinflation, which I see coming not too far down the road, that would be so disruptive to our system that it would result in the cessation of many levels of normal economic commerce, and that would throw us into a great depression, and one worse than was seen in the 1930s.

What kind of hyperinflation are we talking about?

I am talking something like you saw with the Weimar Republic of the 1930s. There the currency became worthless enough that people used it actually as toilet paper or wallpaper. You could go to a fine restaurant and have an expensive dinner and order an expensive bottle of wine. The next morning that empty bottle of wine is worth more as scrap glass than it had been the night before filled with expensive wine.

We just saw an extreme example in Zimbabwe. … Probably the most extreme hyperinflation that anyone has ever seen. At the same time, you still had a functioning, albeit troubled, Zimbabwe economy. How could that be? They had a workable backup system of a black market in U.S. dollars. We don’t have a backup system of anything. Our system, with its heavy dependence on electronic currency, in a hyperinflation would not do well. It would probably cease to function very quickly. You could have disruptions in supply chains to food stores. The economy would devolve into something like a barter system until they came up with a replacement global currency.

Read Full Article Here

 



2010 Is The Year of Terrorism, Economic Crash

2010 Is The Year of Terrorism, Economic Crash

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NqpKLxU3sKw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ofPK5n715-M