noworldsystem.com


Detroit family homes sell for just $10

Detroit family homes sell for just $10

London Telegraph
March 12, 2010

Family homes in Detroit are selling for as little as $10 (£6) in the wake of America’s financial meltdown.

The once thriving industrial city has suffered a dramatic decline following the global economic crisis.

According to Tim Prophit, a real estate agent, the crisis has led to a unprecedented portfolio of homes, but they are failing to sell.

He said there were homes on the market for $100 (£61), but an offer of just $10 (£6) would be likely to be accepted.

Speaking on a BBC 2 documentary, Requiem for Detroit, to be screened on Saturday, Mr Prophit said: “The property is listed by the city of Detroit as being worth $35,000 (£22,000), but the bank know that is impossible to ask.

Read Full Article Here

 

The Death of Detroit (Pictures of an Economic Disaster)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XmFzgWn-tYA

Obama: US cities may have to be bulldozed in order to survive

 



U.S. Cities Turning Into Ghost Towns

U.S. Cities Turning Into Ghost Towns

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kAEuix0SD-M

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XmFzgWn-tYA

 



2010 Is The Year of Terrorism, Economic Crash

2010 Is The Year of Terrorism, Economic Crash

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NqpKLxU3sKw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ofPK5n715-M

 



Big Banks: Keep The Taxpayer Money Coming

AIG, Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and GMAC: “Long-Term Wards of the State”

Cryptogon
December 18, 2009

Via: New York Times:

Even as the biggest banks repay their government debt in what is being heralded as a successful rescue program, four troubled giants of the financial world remain on government life support.

These companies, the American International Group, Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and GMAC, are not only unable to repay the government, they are in need of continuing infusions that make them look increasingly like long-term wards of the state.

And the total risk they pose to the taxpayer far exceeds that of the big banks. Fannie and Freddie, in the final days of the year, are even said to be negotiating with the Treasury about greatly expanding the money available to them.

Though the four are not in all the same businesses, they were caught in one of the same traps: They sold mortgage guarantees — in some cases to each other. Now when homeowners default, as they are doing in record numbers, these companies are covering the losses. Essentially, taxpayer money to these companies is being used partly to protect banks and other investors who own the mortgages.

 



Sign at Tent City: ‘Welcome to Obamaville’

Sign at Tent City: ‘Welcome to Obamaville’

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aMeEi2aCfrc

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WEUINE0nUpM

 



Houses Passes $1.1 Trillion Spending Bill

Houses Passes $1.1 Trillion Spending Bill

Antiwar.com
December 10, 2009

There was a time when the federal government’s annual budget was submitted by the president and decided by the Congress in a relatively straightforward fashion. A time when it wasn’t so difficult to figure out what the government spent taxpayers’ money on.

But this is, or soon will be, 2010, and President Obama’s promises of transparency aside, the new way of doing things in the perpetual wartime economy is to pass bulky spending bills filled with anything and everything Congressmen want on an accelerated schedule, every few months.

In today’s example, a 1088 page $1.1 trillion “compromise” spending bill passed through the House of Representatives in a 221-202 vote along partisan lines. The bill covers everything from veteran’s benefits to arbitration for car dealers and, of course, a hefty raise in the foreign aid budget.

The latest massive spending bill comes less than two months after the White House signed a $680 billion “Defense Spending Bill,” which included hate crimes legislation provisions and restarted military tribunals at Guantanamo Bay.

That bill itself came just a few months after a $106 billion “emergency” war spending bill, which included a number of “pet projects,” including the so-called Cash for Clunkers program that subsidized new car purchases in return for a promise to destroy what were in many cases serviceable used cars.

Which of course came not long after the $787 billion “stimulus bill” aimed at hurling enough money at assorted government programs that the economy would improve.

When President Obama took office, he promised a more transparent budget, particularly with promises to stop requesting “emergency” war spending bills to pay for what are now several year old wars.

This promise, like so many others, will likely be ignored, as the defense budgets have projected a more rapid pullout from Iraq and did not include last week’s massive escalation of the Afghan War, itself a $30 billion addition to the annual cost. Instead, America seems poised to continue the new way of doing things, piecemeal spending bills which provide ample opportunity to include the trendy projects that Congress craves and the unclear picture of the overall cost of war that keeps the voter largely in the dark about how much the nation’s assorted adventures really cost.

 

Look Who got the economy wrong and why are they still in charge

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O23YCB7F5SQ

Obama’s sellout to Wall Street creates ‘permanent bailout’

 



Peter Schiff on The Fed & Your Money

Peter Schiff on The Fed & Your Money

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUPZEUIWANQ