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Man arrested for calling cop a nazi

Man arrested for calling cop a nazi

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NUOsq_45SnQ

 



New Laser Gun To Be Used By U.S. Police

New Laser Gun To Be Used By U.S. Police

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AWaM3xmeh0E

 



Man Faces 5-Years in Prison for Recording Cops

Man Could Face 5-Years in Prison for Recording Cops

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNcDGqzAB30

 



Police Brutality: Cop Relentlessly Beats Unarmed Driver

Police Brutality: Cop Relentlessly Beats Unarmed Driver

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q1joImpo4l0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DiWTmG-2ySg

UPDATE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=81pLXTHRcCQ

Lawsuit: Drunk cop ran over woman, then supervised investigation

Family calls police to help their father who was suicidal because he couldn’t find work – Police respond by killing him instead

State Trooper kills 2 girls, gets probation

 



The Obama DOJ’s warrantless demands for e-mails

The Obama DOJ’s warrantless demands for e-mails

Salon
April 15, 2010


I want your emails.

A very significant case involving core privacy protections is now being litigated, where the Obama Justice Department is seeking to obtain from Yahoo “all emails” sent and received by multiple Yahoo email accounts, despite the fact that DOJ has never sought, let alone obtained, a search warrant, and despite there being no notice of any kind to the email account holders:

    In a brief filed Tuesday afternoon, the coalition says a search warrant signed by a judge is necessary before the FBI or other police agencies can read the contents of Yahoo Mail messages — a position that puts those companies directly at odds with the Obama administration.

As part of a case conducted largely under seal and thus hidden from public view, the DOJ demanded these emails from Yahoo without any effort to demonstrate probable cause to believe the email user was involved in the commission of any crime, but instead merely based on the vague claim that there is “reasonable grounds to believe” the emails “are relevant and material to an ongoing criminal investigation.” If the DOJ position were accepted, Americans would have substantially less privacy protections in their email communications.

Federal law is crystal clear that a search warrant is required for the Government to obtain any emails that have been stored less than 180 days — one that requires a showing of probable cause and that the documents sought to be described with particularlity. In contrast to the nation’s largest telecoms’ eager cooperation with Bush’s illegal surveillance programs, Yahoo — to its credit — refused to turn over any such emails to the Government without a search warrant. As a result, the DOJ is now seeking a federal court Order compelling the company to comply with its demands, and a coalition of privacy groups and technology companies — led by EFF and including Google — have now filed a brief supporting Yahoo’s position. Both Yahoo and that coalition insist that federal law as well as the Fourth Amendment’s search and seizure protection bar the Obama DOJ from acquiring these emails without a search warrant.

Read Full Article Here

Obama Supports DNA Sampling Upon Arrest

Obama will bypass Congress to detain suspects indefinitely

Obama Supports Renewing The PATRIOT ACT

Joe Biden’s pro-RIAA, pro-FBI tech voting record

Obama Votes YES on FISA Spy-Bill, McCain Skips

Obama Supports Giving Telecoms Amnesty for Illegal Wiretaps

Obama Implements ‘Precrime’ ‘Prolonged Detention’ for Detainees

 



Crime Prediction Software Is Here and It’s a Very Bad Idea

Crime Prediction Software Is Here and It’s a Very Bad Idea

GIZMODO
April 14, 2010

There are no naked pre-cogs inside glowing jacuzzis yet, but the Florida State Department of Juvenile Justice will use analysis software to predict crime by young delinquents, putting potential offenders under specific prevention and education programs. Goodbye, human rights!

They will use this software on juvenile delinquents, using a series of variables to determine the potential for these people to commit another crime. Depending on this probability, they will put them under specific re-education programs. Deepak Advani—vice president of predictive analytics at IBM—says the system gives “reliable projections” so governments can take “action in real time” to “prevent criminal activities?”

Really? “Reliable projections”? “Action in real time”? “Preventing criminal activities”? I don’t know about how reliable your system is, IBM, but have you ever heard of the 5th, the 6th, and the 14th Amendments to the United States Constitution? What about article 11 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights? No? Let’s make this easy then: Didn’t you watch that scientology nutcase in Minority Report?

Sure. Some will argue that these juvenile delinquents were already convicted for other crimes, so hey, there’s no harm. This software will help prevent further crimes. It will make all of us safer? But would it? Where’s the guarantee of that? Why does the state have to assume that criminal behavior is a given? And why should the government decide who goes to an specific prevention program or who doesn’t based on what a computer says? The fact is that, even if the software was 99.99% accurate, there will be always an innocent person who will be fucked. And that is exactly why we have something called due process and the presumption of innocence. That’s why those things are not only in the United States Constitution, but in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights too.

Other people will say that government officials already makes these decisions based on reports and their own judgement. True. It seems that a computer program may be fairer than a human, right? Maybe. But at the end the interpretation of the data is always in the hands of humans (and the program itself is written by humans).

But what really worries me is that this is a first big step towards something larger and darker. Actually, it’s the second: IBM says that the Ministry of Justice in the United Kingdom—which has an impeccable record on not pre-judging its citizens—already uses this system to prevent criminal activities. Actually, it may be the third big step, because there’s already software in place to blacklist people as potential terrorist, although most probably not as sophisticated as this.

IBM clearly wants this to go big. They have spent a whooping $12 billion beefing up its analytics division. Again, here’s the full quote from Deepak Advani:

    Predictive analytics gives government organizations worldwide a highly-sophisticated and intelligent source to create safer communities by identifying, predicting, responding to and preventing criminal activities. It gives the criminal justice system the ability to draw upon the wealth of data available to detect patterns, make reliable projections and then take the appropriate action in real time to combat crime and protect citizens.

If that sounds scary to you, that’s because it is. First it’s the convicted-but-potentially-recidivistic criminals. Then it’s the potential terrorists. Then it’s everyone of us, in a big database, getting flagged because some combination of factors—travel patterns, credit card activity, relationships, messaging, social activity and everything else—indicate that we may be thinking about doing something against the law. Potentially, a crime prediction system can avoid murder, robbery, or a terrorist act.

It actually sounds like a good idea. For example, there are certain patterns that can identify psychopaths and potential killers or child abusers or wife beaters. It only makes sense to put a future system in place that can prevent identify potential criminals, then put them under surveillance.

The reality is that it’s not such a good idea: While everything may seem driven by the desire to achieve better security, one single false positive would make the whole system unfair. And that’s not even getting into the potential abuse of such a system. Like the last time IBM got into a vaguely similar business for a good cause, during the 1930s. They shipped a lot of cataloguing machines to certain government in Europe, to put together an advanced census. That was good. Census can improve societies by identifying needs and problems that the government can solve. At the end, however, that didn’t end well for more than 11 million people.

And yes, this comparison is an extreme exaggeration. But one thing is clear: No matter how you look at it, cataloguing people—any kind of people—based on statistical predictive software, and then taking pre-empetive actions against them based on the results, is the wrong way to improve our society. Agreeing with this course of action will inevitably take us into a potentially fatal path. [Yahoo!]

Obama Implements ‘Precrime’ ‘Prolonged Detention’ for Detainees

 



Cops Beat-Down Student Then Charge Him With Assault
April 14, 2010, 12:38 pm
Filed under: maryland, Oppression, police brutality, police crimes, Police State | Tags:

Cops Beat-Down Student Then Charge Him With Assault

Steve Watson
Prisonplanet.com
April 13, 2010

Charges against a Maryland student were dropped yesterday after video was released showing three unprovoked police officers violently beating him to the ground with batons following a basketball game last month.

As the video reveals, John McKenna, 21, was celebrating a Maryland basketball victory on the evening of March 3rd.

As the student walks down the street close to the university’s College Park campus, he is seen waving his arms and dancing jovially. He then slows, stops and backs away upon seeing several horse mounted police ahead of him.

McKenna is then set upon and viciously slammed against a brick wall by dismounted officers in riot gear, who pummel him with batons, knocking him unconscious according to his lawyer.

As a hefty officer takes a run up and delivers a forceful blow to the legs, McKenna, somehow still standing, is hacked to the ground.

The cops then continue to beat McKenna in the head and body around a dozen times in total as he lays crumpled and motionless, neither resisting nor able to defend himself.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=at1q3lIpK3c

Following the incident McKenna was astoundingly charged with “felonies on suspicion of assaulting officers on horseback and their mounts”.

Papers detailing the charges, sworn by Officer Sean McAleavey, state that McKenna and another man, Benjamin C. Donat, aged 19, “struck those officers and their horses causing minor injuries,” and that the horses retaliated and injured McKenna and Donat.

The documents state that the two men were running and screaming in the middle of the road, encouraging an unruly crowd to form.

Prosecutors dropped the charges upon seeing the video of the incident, which was shot by another student. It was discovered by a private investigator working on behalf of McKenna and a codefendant who was also charged with assault against police.

The video clearly shows McKenna was around six feet away from the officers on horseback and did nothing to threaten them or provoke retaliation. It also clearly shows that Donat was not even involved in the incident, despite the officer’s charging claims.