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Obama Attends North American Union Summit

Obama Attends North American Union Summit

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6j7ADbhU8pE

What Is The North American Union?

 



Absolut Promotes Mexico Take Over Of U.S.

Absolut Promotes Mexico Take Over Of U.S.

LA Times
April 4, 2008

The latest advertising campaign in Mexico from Swedish vodka maker Absolut promises to push all the right buttons south of the U.S. border, but it could ruffle a few feathers in El Norte.

The billboard and press campaign, created by advertising agency Teran\TBWA and now running in Mexico, is a colorful map depicting what the Americas might look like in an “Absolut” — i.e., perfect — world.

The U.S.-Mexico border lies where it was before the Mexican-American war of 1848 when California, as we now know it, was Mexican territory and known as Alta California.

Following the war, the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo saw the Mexican territories of Alta California and Santa Fé de Nuevo México ceded to the United States to become modern-day California, Texas, New Mexico, Utah, Colorado and Arizona. (Texas actually split from Mexico several years earlier to form a breakaway republic, and was voluntarily annexed by the United States in 1846.)

The campaign taps into the national pride of Mexicans, according to Favio Ucedo, creative director of leading Latino advertising agency Grupo Gallegos in the U.S.

Ucedo, who is from Argentina, said: “Mexicans talk about how the Americans stole their land, so this is their way of reclaiming it. It’s very relevant and the Mexicans will love the idea.”

But he said that were the campaign to run in the United States, it might fall flat.

“Many people aren’t going to understand it here. Americans in the East and the North or in the center of the county — I don’t know if they know much about the history.

“Probably Americans in Texas and California understand perfectly and I don’t know how they’d take it.”

Meanwhile, the campaign has been circulating on the blogs and generating strong responses from people north of the border.

“I find this ad deeply offensive, and needlessly divisive. I will now make a point of drinking other brands. And ’vodka and tonic’ is my drink,” said one visitor, called New Yorker, on MexicoReporter.com.

Reader Paul Green goes into a discussion on the blog Gateway Pundit of whether the U.S. territories ever belonged to Mexico in the first place, and the News12 Long island site invited people to boycott Absolut, with one user, called LivingSmall, writing: “If you drink Absolut vodka, you can voice your approval or disapproval of this advertising campaign with your purchases. I know I will be switching to Grey Goose or Stoli and will never have another bottle of Absolut in my house.

“Hey Absolut … that’s my form of social commentary.”


La-Z-Boy, Whirlpool Moving Jobs To Mexico

Chattanoogan
April 4, 2008

La-Z-Boy and Whirlpool are moving jobs to new plants in Mexico, bringing job losses to hundreds of workers in Dayton and Cleveland.

La-Z-Boy employees in Dayton were told today that the cutting and sewing operation is being moved to Mexico.

Kathy Liebmann, La-Z-Boy spokesperson, said the Dayton facility has over 2,000 employees, but she did not have a breakdown on those in cutting and sewing. A La-Z-Boy employee said it was around 750.

Ms. Liebmann said La-Z-Boy is closing a plant at Tremonton, Utah, but will keep its other plants open, including the one at Dayton. She said the 400 production jobs at the Utah plant will be spread over the other five plants.

Read Full Article Here

Mexican army finds $6 mln in truck near U.S. border
http://www.reuters.com/article/worldNews/idUSN0447467120080405

DHS Waives Laws To Finish Border Fence
http://www.usatoday.com/printedition/news/20080402/a_border02.art.htm

Center For Inquiry Promotes Global Citizenship
http://www.centerforinquiry.net/newsroom/global_citizenship/

Vet Convicted For Tearing Down Mexico Flag
http://www.roguegovernment.com/news.php?id=8000

 



Building NAFTA’s CANAMEX Supercorridor

Building NAFTA’s CANAMEX Supercorridor

JBS
March 11, 2008

The mainstream press frequently reports that NAFTA trade corridors are a fiction. Meanwhile, work on NAFTA superhighways continues, usually in the open for everyone to see. An example is the CANAMEX corridor. According to the CANAMEX Corridor Coalition:

Since its inception in 1995, the CANAMEX Corridor has grown to become the cornerstone for the seamless and efficient transportation of goods, services, people and information between Canada, Mexico and the United States. As the implementation of NAFTA moves toward fruition, the CANAMEX Corridor will broaden its initiatives to harvest the benefits of increased trade, tourism and economic activity within the region. [emphasis added]

The CANAMEX Coalition helpfully notes that Congress approved the corridor in the 1995 National Highway Systems Designation Act as a “High Priority Corridor.” The Act is now Public Law 104-59, and it specifies:

(26) The CANAMEX Corridor from Nogales, Arizona, through Las Vegas, Nevada, to Salt Lake City, Utah, to Idaho Falls, Idaho, to Montana, to the Canadian Border as follows:

(A) In the State of Arizona, the CANAMEX Corridor shall generally follow– (i) I-19 from Nogales to Tucson; (ii) I-10 from Tucson to Phoenix; and (iii) United States Route 93 in the vicinity of Phoenix to the Nevada Border.

(B) In the State of Nevada, the CANAMEX Corridor shall follow– (i) United States Route 93 from the Arizona Border to Las Vegas; and (ii) I-15 from Las Vegas to the Utah Border.

(C) From the Utah Border through Montana to the Canadian Border, the CANAMEX Corridor shall follow I-15.

The latest action taken to move “the implementation of NAFTA … toward fruition” was Arizona Governor Janet Napolitano’s Executive Order 2008-08. The Executive Order specifies:

The task force known as the Governor’s CANAMEX Task Force (“Task Force”) shall be continued and shall serve the purpose of coordinating statewide CANAMEX efforts and coordinating with other applicable states, provinces and nations in the development of the CANAMEX Corridor.

To download (PDF Format) and read the full text of the executive order, click here.

Anti-Real ID Rebellion Spreads to California
http://blog.wired.com/27bstroke6/2008/03/anti-real-id-re.html

Real ID Would Mean Real Inconveniences
http://www.timesanddemocrat.com/..3/11/opinion/13000646.txt

Globalist EU Leaders Approve Of Mediterranean Union
http://www.euractiv.com/en/enlargeme..rranean/article-170976?_print

Cintra Gets Financing For Texas Toll Road
http://www.reuters.com/article/rbs..UtilitiesNews/idUSMDT00498220080310

Senator Questions Mexican Trucks In U.S.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2008-03-10-mexico-trucks_N.htm

WND Barred From Mexican Trucks Press Event
http://www.wnd.com/index.php?fa=PAGE.view&pageId=58532

Missouri lawmakers’ resolutions take on North American security pact
http://www.kansascity.com/news/local/story/523231.html

What is the ‘North American Union’?

 



U.S. Plans Outline a Subsidized Pan-American Highway


U.S. Plans Outline a Subsidized Pan-American Highway

Jones Report
January 8, 2008

U.S. Title Code TITLE 23 > CHAPTER 2 > § 212 provides for the construction and maintenance of the Inter-American Highway program in cooperation with the Governments of the American Republics in Central America (i.e. Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama).

“Title 23 of the US Code as currently published by the US Government reflects the laws passed by Congress as of Jan. 2, 2006.”

Under the code, the United States essentially pays for up to one-third of the total construction costs (depending on each nation’s wealth):

(a) Not to exceed one-third of the appropriation authorized for each fiscal year may be expended without requiring the country or countries in which such funds may be expended to match any part thereof, if the Secretary of State shall find that the cost of constructing said highway in such country or countries will be beyond their reasonable capacity to bear.

The U.S. also agrees to provide all the maintenance costs:

(5) will provide for the maintenance of said highway after its completion in condition adequately to serve the needs of present and future traffic.

The U.S. has cooperated with Latin America on highway systems since the first Pan American Highway Congress in Buenos Aires in 1925, but footing all the costs for infrastructure can’t be a good sign for expanded globalization to come.

This acceleration of hemispheric-consolidation only correlates with the passage CAFTA in the Central American States and the passage of ‘free trade’ agreements with Panama, Peru and Columbia during 2007. Further, Condoleezza Rice and President Bush have hailed the significant steps towards the broader ‘vision’ of a Pan-American Community.

“The founding ideal of our Pan-American Community, borne across many centuries and carried by us still, is the hope that life in the hemisphere would signify a break with the Old World, and a new beginning for all mankind,” Secretary Rice told the C.F.R. and the Organization of American States in October 2007.

“We now have the potential to create an unbroken chain of trading partners from Tierra del Fuego to the Arctic Circle,” Rice said to the OAS.

Vicente Fox has also advocated not only the North American Union, but hinted at a unified currency throughout the Americas sometime in the future during an appearance on Larry King Live.

An unbroken chain of trading partners– under ever-expanding ‘free trade’ blocs (yes, an oxymoron)– would certainly go hand-in-hand with an inter-connected, well-maintained highway– but subsidizing the expenses is no route to equal or independent nations inside a community, but rather a formula for guaranteeing centralized regional control.

That’s not to say that free travel and reasonably safe and convenient travel is not a worthwhile goal, but certainly many are concerned about the implications such a smaller hemisphere would mean for employment and wages. Even Mexican farmers are now protesting free trade, illegal immigration and the effects of NAFTA, a position American farmers likely never steered from.

Meanwhile, Mexico has already announced its intention to microchip migrant workers coming from Central and South America and other places.

L. Ronald Scheman, founder of the Pan American Development foundation and Senior Advisor to Kissinger McLarty Associates proposes that opportunities to harmonize the Americas can lead to long-term integration along the same route taken by the E.U.— early on, the E.U. was nothing more than a Coal and Steel Community which eventually solidified unification:

“To him, the strategy was clear. ‘This proposal [for a coal and steel community] has an essential political objective: to make a breach in the ramparts of national sovereignty, which will be narrow enough to secure consent — but deep enough to open the way toward the unity that is essential to peace [and we might add, for our purposes in the Americas, for development].'”

T.T.C. Maps Detail Infrastructure Dismissed as “Conspiracy Theory”
http://www.jonesreport.com/article/01_08/090108_ttc_conspiracy.html

NAFTA Jeopardizes Mexican Sugar Industry
http://www.plenglish.com/Article.asp?…EFD4%7D&language=EN

White House OKs Mexican Truck Program
http://www.rawstory.com/news/moc…_truck_progr_01042008.html

What is the ‘North American Union’?

 



Bush Clears US Roads For More NAFTA Trucks

Bush Authorizes Full Access to U.S. Roads for Even More Mexico-Based NAFTA Trucks

Public Citizen
December 10, 2007

Statement of Joan Claybrook, President of Public Citizen

In a stealthy maneuver, the Bush administration has boosted the threat to the public by increasing the number of Mexico-based trucking firms allowed access to all U.S. roads as part of the reckless North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) trucking “pilot program.” The Department of Transportation recently revealed an increase in the number of NAFTA trucks permitted to all U.S. highways – now 10 carriers, sending as many as 55 trucks throughout the country.

The last time the Bush administration made a public announcement about the number of Mexico-based carriers allowed to participate in the NAFTA trucks pilot program, there were only three carriers.

It has long been the tradition by this administration to bury bad news like this by sending out press releases on Friday afternoon, but in this case, the Department of Transportation (DOT) reached a new low: not sending any press release at all, but simply updating a Web page.

Both houses of Congress have passed versions of the DOT spending bill that includes provisions to shut down this dangerous folly. Unfortunately for all members of the public who must travel every day on the nation’s roads, the White House has threatened to veto the final bill. It is high time for President Bush to get out of the way and let the Senate vote on the final bill before any more lives are put at risk.

In 2001, a NAFTA tribunal ordered the U.S. to permit access to all U.S. roads for Mexico-domiciled trucking companies. The Clinton administration refused to comply with the NAFTA tribunal, citing serious safety and environmental concerns with Mexico’s trucking fleet. The Bush administration has tried since 2002 to enforce the NAFTA order to open U.S. highways to unsafe trucks. Congress has intervened repeatedly to stop the Bush administration. In September, the Bush administration tried to meet NAFTA’s dictates by launching a pilot program to allow up to 100 motor carriers from Mexico full access to U.S. highways. However, the project violates a 2001 congressional mandate that Mexico-domiciled trucking companies meet U.S. safety standards regarding hours of service, driver training and licensing, and vehicle safety before being allowed access to the nation’s roadways.

A lawsuit filed by several groups, including Public Citizen, alleging that the pilot program doesn’t meet congressional requirements is still pending in the Ninth Circuit.

What is the ‘North American Union’?

 



Okla. Senator: NAFTA Superhighway Stops Here

‘NAFTA Superhighway stops here,’ says Okla. senator
Trans-Texas Corridor needs to make ‘Texas turnaround’ at state border

Jerome R. Corsi
World Net Daily
October 1, 2007


Oklahoma state Sen. Randy Brogdon

“The NAFTA Superhighway stops here, at the border with Oklahoma,” Randy Brogdon, a Republican state senator who has championed the fight to keep the Trans-Texas Corridor out of Oklahoma, told a packed 300-person audience at the first public meeting of OK-SAFE in Tulsa on Saturday.

Oklahomans for Sovereignty and Free Enterprise, Inc. is a non-profit, Oklahoma corporation set up to oppose a NAFTA Superhighway and North American Union as threats to the sovereignty of the U.S.

Brogdon objected to the Security and Prosperity Partnership of North America, arguing President Bush had entered the agreement after secret discussions with Mexico’s then-president Vicente Fox and Canada’s then-prime minister Paul Martin in Waco, Texas, March 23, 2005.

“President Bush has proven that he is more than willing to over-step his executive authority when it came to trade policy,” Brogdon told the group.

“Ariticle 1 Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution says, ‘Congress shall have the Power to Regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States,’ not the president,” Brogdon pointed out. “Yet President Bush has entered into an agreement with Mexico and Canada called SPP that seeks to eliminate our trade and security borders and he has failed to get the explicit approval of Congress.”

The SPP website, in a section entitled “Myths vs. Facts,” supports Brogdon’s argument, openly admitting that SPP is neither a law nor a treaty.

“Texas highways are famous for ‘Texas turnaround’ U-turns,” Brogdon quipped. “Maybe it’s time we tell Governor Perry to do a Texas turnaround at the border with Oklahoma.”

“We don’t need a new superhighway four-football-fields-wide coming through the heart of our state just so Mexican trucks can carry Chinese containers from Mexican ports to Kansas City,” he said.

Brogdon objected that the Bush administration’s below-the-radar push for a new continental NAFTA Superhighway will risk the supremacy of U.S. laws on U.S. highways.

“Anyone driving on an international highway system running through the United States would be subjected not to U.S. law, but to international law,” Brogdon argued. “We would be subject to an international tribunal in case of a dispute, including accidents or other lawsuits.”

Brogdon objected to the Department of Transportation’s push to allow 100 Mexican trucking companies to have free access on U.S. roads for their long-haul rigs.

“The Bush administration is pushing the Trans-Texas Corridor under the cause of better roads and economic development,” Brogdon stressed. “I’m sure we all want good roads and bridges, but not at the expense of our nation’s sovereignty.”

As WND previously reported, Brogdon has opposed legislation that would have pre-authorized the extension north into Oklahoma, as a deceptive piece of legislation (HB 1917) that would have put Oklahoma in a highway “pilot project” that was unlimited in scope and required Oklahoma to waive its 11th Amendment rights.

“The 11th Amendment gives protection to Oklahoma from being sued in federal court by a foreign nation,” Brogdon explained. “So for us to be a part of this project we had to waive our 11th Amendment rights. This benign piece of legislation that started out as a simple re-surface project in Southeast Oklahoma was in fact the first step to create the NAFTA Superhighway through Oklahoma.”

The bill was strongly supported by the North America’s SuperCorridor Coalition, Inc., a Dallas-based trade organization of which the State of Oklahoma is a member.

Brogdon has championed legislation demanding Oklahoma withdraw from NASCO, saving the state a $25,000 annual membership fee.

“NASCO’s mission statement says their goal is ‘to create the world’s first ‘international, intermodal superhighway’ system,” Brogdon pointed out. “NASCO lobbied the Oklahoma state legislature to pass HB 1917 and they found many of my colleagues sympathetic to their cause. In the state senate, we were able to kill the bill during debate. We won a battle, but the war is not over.”

Brogdon predicted that the battle to extend the Trans-Texas Corridor north into Oklahoma would be pressed once again by NASCO in the Oklahoma legislature’s next session.

“NASCO will probably work with legislators favorable to their cause to package the next bill with a catchy name,” Brogdon warned. “The bill will come down as something like, ‘Economic Development and Transportation for the Next Generation and Our Kids.’ It will be disguised, but I assure you, the outcome will still be the same. Our sovereignty will be under attack.”

Still, Brogdon expressed his confidence in winning the battle against the NAFTA Superhighway in Oklahoma.

“I’m encouraged at what lies ahead for this state and for the nation,” Brogdon told the group. “History reveals that Americans always rise to the occasion to protect this country. We are in a battle for this nation’s sovereignty. But I see American patriots here today, in this assembled group, men and women still dedicated to the Constitutional cause so eloquently laid out by our founding fathers.”

“Ladies and gentlemen, know this – our future will not be determined by the politicians,” Brogdon concluded. “Our future lies solely in our hands because ‘We the People,’ and not some bureaucrats in Washington or a trade group in Dallas, are the government of the United States.”

WND reported NASCO changed its name from the original name, North America’s Superhighway Coalition.

NASCO also has repeatedly redesigned its webpage so as to de-emphasize the continental nature of the “super corridor” NASCO supports.

Infrared Scaners To Scan Automobiles
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-d…./09/30/AR2007093001654_pf.html

What is the ‘North American Union’?

 



Congress debate begins on North American Union

Congress debate begins on North American Union

WND
September 25, 2007

A House resolution urging President Bush “not to go forward with the North American Union or the NAFTA Superhighway system” is – according to its sponsor Rep. Virgil Goode, R-Va., in an exclusive WND interview – “also a message to both the executive branch and the legislative branch.”

As WND previously reported, on Jan. 22 Goode introduced H.C.R. 40, titled “Expressing the sense of Congress that the United States should not engage in the construction of a North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) Superhighway System or enter into a North American Union with Mexico and Canada.”

The bill has been referred to the House Subcommittee on Highways and Transit of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee.

WND asked Goode if the president was risking electoral success for the Republican Party in 2008 with his insistence on pushing for North American integration via the Security and Prosperity Partnership of North America, or SPP.

“Yes,” Goode answered. “You won’t hear the leadership in the Republic Party admit it, but there are many in the House and Senate who know that illegal immigration has to be stopped and legal immigration has to be reduced. We are giving away the country so a few very rich people can get richer.”

How did he react when President Bush referred to those who suggest the SPP could turn into the North American Union as “conspiracy theorists”?

“The president is really engaging in a play on words,” Goode responded. “The secretary of transportation came before our subcommittee,” he explained, “and I had the opportunity to ask her some questions about the NAFTA Superhighway. Of course, she answered, ‘There’s no NAFTA Superhighway.’ But then Mary Peters proceeded to discuss the road system that would come up from Mexico and go through the United States up into Canada.”

Goode is a member of the Subcommittee on Transportation, Treasury, Housing and Urban Development of the House Committee on Appropriations.

“So, I think that saying we’re ‘conspiracy theorists’ or something like that is really just a play on words with the intent to demonize the opposition,” Goode concluded.

Goode stressed that the Bush administration supports both a NAU regional government and a NAFTA Superhighway system: “The Bush administration as well as Mexico and Canada have persons in the government in all three countries who want to a see a North American Union as well as a highway system that would bring goods into the west coast of Mexico and transport them up through Mexico into the United States and then in onto Canada,” Goode confirmed.

The Virginia congressman said he believes the motivation behind the movement toward North American integration is the anticipated profits the large multinational corporations in each of the three countries expect to make from global trade, especially moving production to China.

“Some really large businesses that get a lot from China would like a NAFTA Superhighway system because it would reduce costs for them to transport containers from China and, as a result, increase their margins,” he argued.

“I am vigorously opposed to the Mexican trucks coming into the country,” Goode continued. “The way we have done it and, I think, the way we should do it in the future, is to have the goods come into the United States from Mexico within a 20-mile commercial space and unloaded from Mexican trucks into U.S. trucks. This procedure enhances the safety of the country, the security of the country, and provides much less chance for illegal immigration.”

As WND reported, the Department of Transportation has begun a Mexican truck “demonstration project” under which 100 Mexican trucking companies are being allowed to run their long-haul rigs throughout the U.S.

Previously, Mexican trucks have been limited to a 20-mile commercial zone in the United States, with the requirement that goods bound for locations in the U.S. beyond the 20-mile commercial zone be off-loaded to U.S. trucks.

WND reported last month that Sen. Byron Dorgan, D-N.D., successfully offered an amendment to the Department of Transportation Fiscal Year 2008 appropriations bill to block DOT from spending any federal funds to implement the truck project.

Dorgan’s amendment passed 75-23, after Sen. Elizabeth Dole, R-N.C., changed her vote to support Dorgan.

By a voice vote, the House passed an amendment offered by Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore., to the DOT appropriations bill comparable to Dorgan’s, designed to block the agency from using federal funds to implement the truck project.

DeFazio chairs the House transportation subcommittee that oversees motor carriers.

“With the Trans-Texas Corridor, which I would say is part of the NAFTA Superhighway system, and with this NAFTA plot with the Mexican trucks just coming in and not loading off to U.S. trucks, they will just drive right over the Rio Grande and come on over into Texas,” Goode argued. “A lot of these Mexican trucks will be bring containerized cargo from the west coast of Mexico where they will be unloaded in Mexican ports to avoid the fees and costs of unloading at U.S. ports.”

“So, when you look at the total package,” he continued, “we do have a NAFTA Superhighway system already in place. There are those in all three countries that believe we should have a North American Union and the Security and Prosperity Partnership, in my opinion takes us down that road. And I am vigorously opposed to the loss of our sovereignty.”

Why, WND asked, do so many congressmen and senators insist on writing and telling their constituents that they don’t know anything about the Security and Prosperity Partnership, or that SPP working groups are really just to increase our competitiveness?

“In the House, a strong majority voted to provide no money in the transportation funding bill,” Goode responded. “I commend Congressman Duncan Hunter for submitting an amendment to the Department of Transportation funding bill [which] got over 360 votes that said no funds in the transportation appropriation measure, prohibiting Department of Transportation funds from being used to participate on working groups that promote the Security and Prosperity Partnership.”

As WND reported, Hunter’s amendment to the FY 2008 Department of Transportation funding bill prohibiting DOT from using federal funds to participate in SPP working groups creating NAFTA Superhighways passed 362 to 63, with strong bipartisan support. The House approved H.R. 3074 by 268-153, with the Hunter amendment included.

“So, I think a majority the House, if you had an up or down vote on the SPP, would vote down on the SPP,” Goode concluded. “But some still say, and it’s a play on words, that we don’t have a Security and Prosperity Partnership that will lead to a North American Union. I don’t think they can say anymore that we don’t have a Security and Prosperity Partnership arrangement between the U.S., Mexico, and Canada, because that was done in Waco, Texas, on March 23, 2005, and the recent meeting at Montebello was to talk about it further.”

WND asked Goode to comment on the North American Competitiveness Council, or NACC, a group of multinational corporations selected by the Chambers of Commerce in Mexico, Canada and the U.S. as the central adviser of SPP working groups.

At the SPP summit in Montebello, Quebec, the NACC met behind closed doors with the three leaders, cabinet secretaries who were present, and top SPP working group bureaucrats, while various public advocacy groups, environmental groups, labor unions – and the press – were excluded.

Should SPP working group meetings be open to the public?

“I wish they were,” Goode responded. “If it is as the Bush administration says, ‘We’re not planning any North American Union,’ then why wouldn’t those meetings be open, why wouldn’t you let the media in?” Goode asked.

“But some of the very big corporations want the goods from China to come in here unchecked,” he continued. “It costs money for U.S. trucks to transport Chinese goods from West Coast ports like Los Angeles or Long Beach. But if you can have a Mexican truck and Mexican truck driver, that’s going to be cheaper. And it’s all about the margins. The margins relate directly to how much money the multi-national corporations are going to make.”

Has the Senate debate on the Dorgan amendment brought the issues of the NAU and NAFTA Superhighways more to the attention of the Senate?

“I think so,” Goode said. “That debate had a very positive effect. You had grassroots support calling the Senate on the Dorgan amendment.

“The Bush administration engages in the same play of words with all these issues,” Goode added. “Take a look at the Kennedy-McCain comprehensive immigration reform, which the Bush administration has now tried to jam through the Senate not once, but twice.

“The Bush administration claims it’s not [amnesty] when you let someone stay in the country and give them a path to citizenship,” Goode pointed out. “Well, that’s their definition, not my definition, and not the definition of the majority of the public. The majority of the public called in and buried the amnesty bill because of public pressure. Public pressure also got de-funded the pilot program on Mexican trucks in this country.”

So should the U.S. pull out of the SPP?

“Yes,” Goode answered, “but the best way to end SPP would be to have a chief executive that wouldn’t do anything with it.”

What does Goode think of the state legislatures that are passing anti-NAU, anti-NAFTA Superhighway and anti-SPP resolutions?

“If enough state legislatures pass resolutions like that, it surely should have an impact on the House and the Senate,” Goode said.

“President Bush’s position is that we need to carry out NAFTA and we need to have this free flow of goods with Mexico and Canada,” Goode explained. “Well, Bush’s approach involves a derogation of our sovereignty and it also undermines the security and the safety of the country.

“It will be much easier for a truck to get a container on the west coast of Mexico and haul in a biological or radiological or nuclear weapon than it would be if you are going to have to unload the trucks on the Texas-Mexico border and put the goods and material in a U.S. truck,” he continued.

“The problem is that the NAU, NAFTA Superhighways and SPP all go back to money,” Goode stressed. “The multinational companies want their goods from Mexico and China because they want the cheap labor.”

What about the U.S.’s large and growing trade imbalance with China?

“I don’t want to have to be an ‘I told you so’ person,” Goode answered, “but I was a vigorous opponent of PNTR (“permanent normal trade relations”) and before that of ‘most favored nation’ trade status with China. We need tariffs and quotas with China. Personally, if I know food is coming in from China, I won’t buy it. The American people with the adoption of COOL, country of origin labeling, with the food clearly labeled, I think you will see the American public will shy away from Chinese products.”

In 2000, Congress voted to extend to China PNTR. “Most favored nation” or MFN trade status, was given to China first in 1980 by the Carter administration. COOL rules are administered by the Department of Agriculture.

Goode concluded the interview by thanking WND for covering the SPP, NAU and NAFTA Superhighway issues: “I want to thank you for putting these issues out where people can read it,” Goode said. “You have enlightened hundreds of thousands if not millions of American citizens who otherwise would have been greatly in the dark on the SPP.”

Private Toll Roads In Florida?
http://www.miamiherald.com/467/story/248197.html

Reason Magazine calls NAU agenda “a Xenophobic Fantasy”
http://reason.com/news/show/122632.html

Canada: Losing Water Through NAFTA
http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?c..va&aid=6859

How the Government Will Toll Existing Roads Electronically with Transponders in Cars
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LKauoewoOPw

Mexicans pour into Canada from U.S
http://www.canada.com/nation…9f47-9bd487596021&k=8472

What is the ‘North American Union’?