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Peter Schiff on The Fed & Your Money

Peter Schiff on The Fed & Your Money

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUPZEUIWANQ

 



Sam Donaldson: End The Fed Before They Do Further Damage

Sam Donaldson: End The Fed Before They Do Further Damage

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n21OTy-Klk0

 



Schiff: Get out of the U.S. Dollar NOW

Peter Schiff: Get out of the U.S. Dollar NOW

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sjbgdg2_7XI

 



Robert Kiyosaki: Silver Best Hedge Against Inflation

Robert Kiyosaki: Silver Best Hedge Against Inflation

Robert Kiyosaki is a motivational speaker, businessman, investor and author of the Rich Dad, Poor Dad series. In the following interview with Newsmax.tv Kiyosaki explains the reasons why Americans should be investing in silver.

Kiyosaki says silver is the best hedge against inflation and that in many ways the precious metal is a better investment than gold. He is a very strong buyer of silver and has been investing heavily in for over 10 years.

Why Silver Cannot Lose

Robert Kiyosaki
August 20, 2007

I believe the biggest opportunity today is in silver. I think this precious metal is about to become the most spectacular investment in recent history — bigger than oil, even bigger than Google.

Let me give you some reasons why:

Silver is a consumable industrial commodity.

It’s used in computers, cells phones, and electrical relays. This means that as countries like China, India, and Vietnam, and regions like Eastern Europe, become more modernized, the demand for silver will increase.

Silver is also applied in medicine. One little-known use is as a bactericide, a role silver has filled throughout history. Today, medical devices such as catheters and stethoscopes use silver, and every hospital in the western world uses silver sulfadiazine to prevent infections.

Silver is scarcer than gold.

Gold is hoarded. It’s estimated that 95 percent of all gold ever mined is still around. The exact opposite is true of silver: An estimated 95 percent of all silver ever mined has been consumed.

Forty-five percent of all silver mined is burned up in industrial uses. Jewelry accounts for 28 percent, and 20 percent has been consumed in photography. Only 5 percent is in coins.

Silver supplies are down.

In 1900, it was estimated that the world had 12 billion ounces of silver. By 1990 it had dropped to 2.2 billion ounces. By 2007, the supply was down to 300 million ounces.

Some of the more pessimistic forecasts estimate that the world will be out of silver in about 10 years. This could be catastrophic to the world economy. In 10 years, silver might have as much of an impact on the world economy as $200-a-barrel oil.

 



Richard Belzer calls out Federal Reserve on HBO

Richard Belzer calls out Federal Reserve on HBO

 



Gold Hits New Record High of $1,043/oz

Gold Hits New Record High of $1,043/oz

NoWorldSystem.com
October 6, 2009

Gold has hit a new record this morning at $1,043/oz.

Bank of America predicts gold prices will hit $1,500/oz by 2011 and Peter Schiff an Economic Analyst stated he sees gold reaching $1,500 to $5,000/oz, if the trend of gold keeps going up it would mean the dollar is collapsing.

The Federal Reserve will likely raise interest rates soon, the fed’s plan to save the economy is by continuing to flood the market with fiat dollar that are backed by nothing, the economy is slowly being lowered into the ground like a casket. Ever since the country got off the gold standard the dollar has devalued resulting in inflated prices in all commodities.

The sharp rise of gold from under $1,000 to quickly $1,043 is also likely attributed by the recent G20 and UN meetings discussing the hatred of the dollar as the leading currency in the world market and the desire to move toward a new economic World Order by creating a global fiat currency (SDR bonds) that are printed by the IMF.

Owning gold is really a long term investment and a safe-haven when there’s dreary times; with record debt and unemployment, socialism for the banks and auto corporations, plans for mandatory health-insurance, the failed costly-wars in the middle-east and the hawkish stance against Iran and Pakistan.. it’s going to be one hell of a ride in the next few years.

 

Ron Paul on Fox News – “We MUST go back to the gold standard”


World Bank and IMF Join Global Attack on U.S. Dollar

World Bank and IMF Join Global Attack on U.S. Dollar

Larry Edelson
Money and Markets
October 4, 2009

In my emails to you over the past couple of weeks, I’ve shown you why Washington has no choice but to devalue the dollar — and how global leaders and even the United Nations have joined the attack on the greenback by demanding it be replaced as the world’s reserve currency.

Now, just this week, the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank have begun adding their voices to the international choir calling for a new global reserve currency:

* Last week, World Bank President Robert Zoellick warned that the dollar’s status will be challenged and shouldn’t be taken for granted.

* According to Turkish Deputy Prime Minister Ali Babacan, it’s likely that the role of special drawing rights (SDRs) based on a basket of currencies will be discussed as an alternative to the dollar during meetings of the World Bank and IMF in Istanbul next week.

* Meanwhile, global governments, central banks, companies and investors continue to slash their dollar holdings. According to the IMF, in April through June of this year, the greenback’s share of global currency reserves fell to the lowest level in a decade. Holdings of euros, in contrast, rose to a new all-time record high.

All this adds weight and momentum to the devaluation of the dollar. It is DEFINITELY ON THE TABLE. Indeed, for the first time I can remember, the G-7 finance officials, meeting this weekend, are rumored to be breaking with tradition and choosing not to release a statement on the global economy and currencies.

I feel this is an extremely significant development: At last week’s G-20 meeting, the group officially anointed itself as being in charge of global economic affairs.

Plus, we now have the G-7 refusing to discuss the dollar, which is highly unusual. Many will say that, if the G-7 does indeed refuse to comment on the dollar at this weekend’s meeting, it’s merely a sign they’re beginning to turn the reigns over to the G-20 for currency matters.

Baloney! The G-7 WILL discuss the huge “global economic imbalances” in the world. And to me, that’s code talk for a currency devaluation on the agenda. Members of the G-7 ARE discussing it. They’re just NOT doing it in public.

It reminds me of the 1985 Plaza Accord, where James Baker committed the U.S. to a depreciating dollar, bulldozing over our creditors, and ultimately precipitating the ‘87 crash.

The difference: Back then the U.S. was in a position to lead the devaluation. Today, it’s not. Today, our creditors are going to bulldoze over us.

 

IMF Catapults From Shunned Agency to Global Central Bank Issuing Debt to the World While U.S. Dollar Plummets

Huffington Post
October 2, 2009

“A year ago,” said law professor Ross Buckley on Australia’s ABC News last week, “nobody wanted to know the International Monetary Fund. Now it’s the organiser for the international stimulus package which has been sold as a stimulus package for poor countries.”

The IMF may have catapulted to a more exalted status than that. According to Jim Rickards, director of market intelligence for scientific consulting firm Omnis, the unannounced purpose of last week’s G20 Summit in Pittsburgh was that “the IMF is being anointed as the global central bank.” Rickards said in a CNBC interview on September 25 that the plan is for the IMF to issue a global reserve currency that can replace the dollar.

“They’ve issued debt for the first time in history,” said Rickards. “They’re issuing SDRs. The last SDRs came out around 1980 or ’81, $30 billion. Now they’re issuing $300 billion. When I say issuing, it’s printing money; there’s nothing behind these SDRs.

SDRs, or Special Drawing Rights, are a synthetic currency originally created by the IMF to replace gold and silver in large international transactions. But they have been little used until now. Why does the world suddenly need a new global fiat currency and global central bank? Rickards says it because of “Triffin’s Dilemma,” a problem first noted by economist Robert Triffin in the 1960s. When the world went off the gold standard, a reserve currency had to be provided by some large-currency country to service global trade. But leaving its currency out there for international purposes meant that the country would have to continually buy more than it sold, running large deficits; and that meant it would eventually go broke. The U.S. has fueled the world economy for the last 50 years, but now it is going broke. The U.S. can settle its debts and get its own house in order, but that would cause world trade to contract. A substitute global reserve currency is needed to fuel the global economy while the U.S. solves its debt problems, and that new currency is to be the IMF’s SDRs.

That’s the solution to Triffin’s dilemma, says Rickards, but it leaves the U.S. in a vulnerable position. If we face a war or other global catastrophe, we no longer have the privilege of printing money. We will have to borrow the global reserve currency like everyone else, putting us at the mercy of the global lenders.

To avoid that, the Federal Reserve has hinted that it is prepared to raise interest rates, even though that would mean further squeezing the real estate market and the real economy. Rickards pointed to an oped piece by Fed governor Kevin Warsh, published in The Wall Street Journal on the same day the G20 met. Warsh said that the Fed would need to raise interest rates if asset prices rose – which Rickards interpreted to mean gold, the traditional go-to investment of investors fleeing the dollar. “Central banks hate gold because it limits their ability to print money,” said Rickards. If gold were to suddenly go to $1,500 an ounce, it would mean the dollar was collapsing. Warsh was giving the market a heads up that the Fed wasn’t going to let that happen. The Fed would raise interest rates to attract dollars back into the country. As Rickards put it, “Warsh is saying, ‘We sort of have to trash the dollar, but we’re going to do it gradually.’ . . . Warsh is trying to preempt an unstable decline in the dollar. What they want, of course, is a stable, steady decline.”

What about the Fed’s traditional role of maintaining price stability? It’s nonsense, said Rickards. “What they do is inflate the dollar to prop up the banks.” The dollar has to be inflated because there is more debt outstanding than money to pay it with. The government currently has contingent liabilities of $60 trillion. “There’s no feasible combination of growth and taxes that can fund that liability,” Rickards said. The government could fund about half that in the next 14 years, which means the dollar needs to be devalued by half in that time.

The Dollar Needs to be Devalued by Half?

Reducing the value of the dollar by half means that our hard-earned dollars are going to go only half as far, something that does not sound like a good thing for Main Street. Indeed, when we look more closely, we see that the move is not designed to serve us but to serve the banks. Why does the dollar need to be devalued? It is to compensate for a dilemma in the current monetary scheme that is even more intractable than Triffin’s, one that might be called a fraud. There is never enough money to cover the outstanding debt, because all money today except coins is created by banks in the form of loans, and more money is always owed back to the banks than they advance when they create their loans. Banks create the principal but not the interest necessary to pay their loans back.

The Fed, which is owned by a consortium of banks and was set up to serve their interests, is tasked with seeing that the banks are paid back; and the only way to do that is to inflate the money supply to create the dollars to cover the missing interest. But that means diluting the value of the dollar, which imposes a stealth tax on the citizenry; and the money supply is inflated by making more loans, which adds to the debt and interest burden that the inflated money supply was supposed to relieve. The banking system is basically a pyramid scheme, which can be kept going only by continually creating more debt.

The IMF’s $500 Billion Stimulus Package:
Designed to Help Developing Countries or the Banks?

And that brings us back to the IMF’s stimulus package discussed last week by Professor Buckley. The package was billed as helping emerging nations hard hit by the global credit crisis, but Buckley doubts that that is what is really going on. Rather, he says, the $500 billion pledged by the G20 nations is “a stimulus package for the rich countries’ banks.”

Why does he think that? Because stimulus packages are usually grants. The money coming from the IMF will be extended in the form of loans.

These are loans that are made by the G20 countries through the IMF to poor countries. They have to be repaid and what they’re going to be used for is to repay the international banks now. . . . [T]he money won’t really touch down in the poor countries. It will go straight through them to repay their creditors. . . . But the poor countries will spend the next 30 years repaying the IMF.

Basically, said Professor Buckley, the loans extended by the IMF represent an increase in seniority of the debt. That means developing nations will be even more firmly locked in debt than they are now.

At the moment the debt is owed by poor countries to banks, and if the poor countries had to, they could default on that. The bank debt is going to be replaced by debt that’s owed to the IMF, which for very good strategic reasons the poor countries will always service. . . . The rich countries have made this $500 billion available to stimulate their own banks, and the IMF is a wonderful party to put in between the countries and the debtors and the banks.

Not long ago, the IMF was being called obsolete. Now it is back in business with a vengeance; but it’s the old unseemly business of serving as the collection agency for the international banking industry. As long as third world debtors can service their loans by paying the interest on them, the banks can count the loans as “assets” on their books, allowing them to keep their pyramid scheme going by inflating the global money supply with yet more loans. It is all for the greater good of the banks and their affiliated multinational corporations; but the $500 billion in funding is coming from the taxpayers of the G20 nations, and the foreseeable outcome will be that the United States will join the ranks of debtor nations subservient to a global empire of central bankers.

 

Man Throws Shoe at IMF Chief