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Russian Senior Officer Exposes Police Corruption

Russian Senior Officer Exposes Police Corruption

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sPkyxzbfPiM

This was about the worst police beating I’ve ever seen, and they leave him there cuffed and bloody for passer-by’s to see. . .

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E7pJMIAIdJA

Police officer in Russia randomly attack gamblers in casino and beat them brutally, the police were free of all charges.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hkb2Q-jG86A

Russian SWAT (OMON) kills innocent boy for fun.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dw2_Zs140lg

Russian special forces bust wrong car: Police were searching for a Porsche Cayenne carrying bank robbers, the vehicle fit the description so they stopped the car, broke the windows and threw flash grenades seriously beating the passengers. . . Only after attacking had they found out about their mistake.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4UuQf3j3XI

 



Russia: We’ll Nuke ‘Aggressors’ First

Russia: We’ll Nuke ‘Aggressors’ First

Wired
October 14, 2009

Russia is weighing changes to its military doctrine that would allow for a “preventive” nuclear strike against its enemies — even those armed only with conventional weapons. The news comes just as American diplomats are trying to get Russia to cut down its nuclear stockpile, and put the squeeze on Iran’s suspect nuclear program.

In an interview published today in Izvestia, Nikolai Patrushev, the secretary of the Kremlin’s security council, said the new doctrine offers “different options to allow the use of nuclear weapons, depending on a certain situation and intentions of a would-be enemy. In critical national security situations, one should also not exclude a preventive nuclear strike against the aggressor.”

What’s more, Patrushev said, Russia is revising the rules for the employment of nukes to repel conventionally armed attackers, “not only in large-scale, but also in a regional and even a local war.”

Gulp. If I were in Georgia — or in any other country Russia considers part of its sphere of influence — that formulation would make me pretty anxious.

The Russian Federation is considering the “first strike” option as part of a larger overhaul of military doctrine. The new doctrine, which is supposed to be presented to President Dmitry Medvedev later this year, is supposed to provide “flexible and timely” responses to national security threats.

The United States and Russia may prepping to negotiate a new strategic arms reduction treaty after President Obama declared a “reset” in relations between Moscow and Russia. But Patrushev, apparently, didn’t get the memo. In the interview, he takes a swipe at the United States and NATO, saying that the alliance “continues to press for the admission of new members to NATO, the military activities of the bloc are intensifying, and U.S. strategic forces are conducting intensive exercises to improve the management of strategic nuclear weapons.”

In other words, Moscow is holding to a hard line, precisely at a time when Washington is trying to play nice. The administration wants the Kremlin’s help — to pressure Iran, to revive the arms-control process — but the bear still needs to brandish nukes.

 



Putin Blames U.S. For Staging Georgian Conflict

Putin Blames U.S. For Staging Georgian Conflict

Steve Watson
Infowars.net
August 29, 2008

In an interview with CNN, Russia’s Prime Minister Vladimir Putin has stated that the Georgian-South Ossetian conflict may have been manufactured by the White House for domestic political reasons. Putin also says that preliminary reports show U.S. citizens may have been present in the combat zone.

“We have serious reason to believe that American citizens were right at the heart of the military action. This would have implications for American domestic policy.” Putin told CNN.

“If this is confirmed, then it raises the suspicion that someone in the US specially created this conflict to worsen the situation and create an advantage in the competitive struggle for one of the candidates for the post of president of the United States.” he continued.

“They needed a short, victorious war.”

“And if it didn’t work out, they could always put the blame on us, make us look like the enemy and against the background of this surge of patriotism, once more rally the country around a particular political force.” Putin explained.

Watch a Russia Today report on Putin’s comments:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xg-GX-XtRkY

In addition to the remarks broadcast by Russia Today, Putin charged that Americans on the ground in Georgia were “implementing orders” from their “leader” during the conflict.

“The fact is that US citizens were indeed in the area in conflict during the hostilities. It should be admitted that they would do so only following direct orders from their leaders,” Putin said.

“Therefore, they were acting in implementing those orders, doing as they were ordered, and the only one who can give such orders is their leader,” he added.

The comments come in the wake of news that a U.S. passport was found in a building in South Ossetia occupied by Georgian troops.

As we have documented, reports of American mercenaries being captured and found dead inside South Ossetia and Georgia circulated in the days after the conflict began.

Putin also told the CNN interviewer that the Georgian army was armed and trained for the conflict.

“Why hold years of difficult talks and seek complex compromise solutions in inter-ethnic conflicts? It’s easier to arm one side and push it into the murder of the other side, and it’s over,” he said.

“It seems like an easy solution. In reality it turns out that it’s not always so.”

Putin may have been referring to the military exercise Immediate Response 2008, which took place last month, involving no less than one thousand U.S. troops working with Georgian troops in a war game scenario. It was also well documented that Georgian troops were flown out of Iraq by the U.S. to join the conflict in South Ossetia. Aside from these facts, it is common knowledge that Washington provides training and equipment to the Georgian military, one of its coalition allies.

 

U.S. citizen was among Georgian commandos – Russian Military

Russia Today
August 29, 2008

A U.S. passport was found in a building in South Ossetia occupied by Georgian troops, a Russian military spokesperson revealed on Thursday. After Russian peacekeepers cleared the heavily defended building, a passport belonging to a Texan named Michael Lee White was discovered inside.

Deputy Chief of Russia’s General Staff Anatoly Nagovitsyn showed photocopies of the passport to media in a press briefing on Thursday.

“There is a building in Zemonekozi – a settlement to the south of Tskhinval that was fiercely defended by a Georgian special operations squad. Upon clearing the building, Russian peacekeepers recovered, among other documents, an American passport in the name of Michael Lee White of Texas,” said Nagovitsyn.

Neither the owner of the passport nor his remains were found at the scene, despite a thorough search.

“I do not know why he was there, but it is a fact that he was in the building, among Georgian special forces troops,” Nagovitsyn said.

The briefing was delivered on the same day Prime Minister Vladimir Putin told CNN, “We have serious reasons to believe that American citizens were right at the heart of the military action”. Putin said the conflict in South Ossetian may have been planned to benefit one of the U.S. presidential candidates.

 

Military help for Georgia is a ’declaration of war’, says Moscow

This is London
August 28, 2008

Moscow has issued an extraordinary warning to the West that military assistance to Georgia for use against South Ossetia or Abkhazia would be viewed as a “declaration of war” by Russia.

The extreme rhetoric from the Kremlin’s envoy to NATO came as President Dmitry Medvedev stressed he will make a military response to US missile defence installations in eastern Europe, sending new shudders across countries whose people were once blighted by the Iron Curtain.

And Moscow also emphasised it was closely monitoring what it claims is a build-up of NATO firepower in the Black Sea.

The incendiary warning on Western military involvement in Georgia – where NATO nations have long played a role in training and equipping the small state – came in an interview with Dmitry Rogozin, a former nationalist politician who is now ambassador to the North Atlantic Alliance.

“If NATO suddenly takes military actions against Abkhazia and South Ossetia, acting solely in support of Tbilisi, this will mean a declaration of war on Russia,” he stated.

Read Full Article Here

U.S. Expects to Rebuild Georgian Army
http://www.moscowtimes.ru/articles/detail.php?ID=370267

Russia: NATO interference in the caucasus means war
http://www.presstv.ir/detail.aspx?id=67757&sectionid=351020602

Putin accuses U.S. of orchestrating Georgian war
http://edition.cnn.com/2008/WO..ssia.georgia.cold.war/index.html

Russia threatens sale of offensive weapons to Israel’s enemies
http://www.worldtribune.com/worldtr..eu_russia0447_08_20.asp

 



Cheney to visit Georgia, WH calls enclave independence “unfortunate”

Cheney travels to Georgia, Ukraine next week

AFP
August 25, 2008

US Vice President Dick Cheney will visit Georgia next week in a show of support for the war-battered US ally amid a deepening freeze in Russian ties with the West, the White House said Monday.

Cheney will become the most senior US official to visit the former Soviet republic since Russian tanks rolled into its smaller neighbor when Tbilisi tried to retake the Moscow-backed rebel region of South Ossetia by force.

The vice president, who warned early in the crisis that “Russian aggression must not go unanswered,” will also visit Azebaijan, Ukraine and attend an economic forum in Italy, the White House said.

Read Full Article Here

 

Bush to issue statement on Russia-Georgia situation

Reuters
August 26, 2008

President George W. Bush on Tuesday will issue a statement on Russia’s recognition of breakaway Georgia regions, which the White House called an “unfortunate decision.”

Russia has been making a number of “irrational decisions” related to the conflict, White House spokesman Tony Fratto said in Texas where Bush is at his Crawford ranch.

“So far we’ve seen a series of unfortunate decisions by the Russians that only serve to further isolate them. And we hope that they hear the loud voices from the international community and understand that it’s not in their long-term interests to take these kinds of actions,” Fratto said.

He called “ridiculous” Russian President Dmitry Medvedev’s accusation, in an interview with the BBC, that the United States was shipping arms to Georgia on naval vessels.

“I can assure you that these are purely humanitarian aid shipments that are going into Georgia and nothing else,” Fratto said.

 



Georgian President Vows to Overthrow South Ossetia and Abkhazia

Georgian President Vows to Overthrow South Ossetia and Abhkazia

NY Times
August 25, 2008

President Mikheil Saakashvili of Georgia said Sunday that he planned to rebuild his country’s shattered army, and that even after its decisive defeat in the war for control of one of Georgia’s two separatist enclaves he would continue to pursue a policy of uniting both under the Georgian flag.

“It will stay the same,” he said of his ambition to bring the enclaves, South Ossetia and Abkhazia, under Georgian control. “Now as ever.”

Both houses of Russia’s Parliament, meanwhile, voted unanimously Monday to ask President Dmitri A. Medvedev to recognize the enclaves’ independence. But the measure, which requires the president’s approval to take effect, was seen as symbolic.

Separately, the White House on Monday announced that Vice President Dick Cheney would visit the region from Sept. 2, stopping in Azerbaijan, Georgia, Ukraine and Italy to discuss the crisis.

Read Full Article Here

 



Russian Parliament Votes to Recognize South Ossetia and Abkhazia
Russian Parliament Votes to Recognize South Ossetia and Abkhazia

Bloomberg
August 25, 2008

Both houses of the Russian parliament called on President Dmitry Medvedev to recognize the independence of two breakaway Georgian regions that sparked Russia’s first foreign military incursion since the Soviet era.

“Today we are faced with, I’m not afraid to say, a historic decision, to call upon the president of the Russian Federation to recognize the independence of South Ossetia and Abkhazia,” Sergei Mironov, the speaker of the upper house, said in an address to lawmakers in Moscow today.

South Ossetia and Abkhazia, which broke away from Georgia in wars in the early 1990s, have cited Kosovo’s Feb. 17 declaration of independence from Serbia as a precedent for their aspirations. Medvedev — who alone can decide on whether to recognize the territories — has said previously that Russia supports the regions’ decisions on their future status, while stopping short of formally recognizing them. President George W. Bush has insisted the regions remain a part of Georgia.

Both the lower chamber, the state Duma, and the upper house, the Federation Council, voted unanimously in support of independence.

“Medvedev will recognize both regions,” said Alexander Rahr, a Russia expert at the German Council on Foreign Relations in Berlin. “There’s no way out,” he said. “This is a consequence of the recognition of Kosovo by the West and Western policy in the Balkans.”

 

Upper chamber backs independence of Abkhazia and South Ossetia

Russia Today
August 25, 2008

Russia’s upper chamber of parliament has unanimously voted to ask the Russian President to recognise independence of Abkhazia and South Ossetia.

As the emergency session of the Federation Council began in Moscow, the presidents of the two breakaway republics have once again said they will never agree to remain within Georgia.

In his speech, the President of South Ossetia, Eduard Kokoity, said that both unrecognised states have more right to independence than Kosovo.

“As President of South Ossetia and on behalf of the South Ossetian parliament and its people, with all gratitude to the President of the Russian Federation I once again call for the recognition of South Ossetia as an independent state,” he said before the senators.

Abkhazian President Sergey Bagapsh, for his part, said neither Abkhazia nor South Ossetia will live as one state with Georgia.

Meanwhile, the Parliament’s lower chamber, the State Duma will most probably back the recognition of South Ossetia and Abkhazia, said Konstantin Zatulin, deputy head of the Duma Committee for International Affairs.

MPs have gathered to discuss draft appeals to the Russian President and the parliaments of UN member states in connection with Georgia’s military attack on South Ossetia.

In his address the Speaker of the Duma, Boris Gryzlov, called Georgia’s action a case of genocide and compared it to the aggression of Nazi Germany against the Soviet Union.

Even if Russia recognises Abkhazia and South Ossetia, the entire process will take a long time. There will be a need to decide what form their independence will take.

But if NATO makes a strong push to bring Georgia into the alliance, Russia will recognise both of them instantaneously, says RT’s political commentator Peter Lavelle.
Hard road to independence

South Ossetia, which borders Russia in the south Caucasus, and Abkhazia on the Black Sea had previously attempted to break away from Georgia following referendums which were overwhelmingly in favour of independence. The results were ignored by Tbilisi, which claimed the ethnic Georgians forced to flee the regions were not consulted. The recent conflict in South Ossetia has added further urgency to the demands for self-determination.

The roots of the current discord can be traced back to the divide and conquer policies of Joseph Stalin – himself half Georgian, half Ossetian. Before the 1917 revolution, the ethnic groups of the Caucasus all lived as separate subjects of the Russian empire. However, with the Bolsheviks came the redrawing of the map, with both South Ossetia and Abkhazia becoming parts of Georgia.

When the Soviet Union collapsed, the then Georgian leader Zviad Gamsakhurdia advocated a nationalist “Georgia for the Georgians” policy, re-opening old wounds. Two military conflicts followed, leaving thousands dead and forcing many more to flee the conflict zones.

The ceasefire in the early 1990s brought de-facto independence to both regions with the shaky truce maintained by peacekeeping forces of mainly Russian troops.

Russia has never recognised the independence of either republic, although Georgia has repeatedly accused Moscow of trying to annex its territory.

Since becoming president in 2004, Mikhail Saakashvili has pledged to bring his country closer to the West, which has also motivated his drive to end the territorial disputes.

Ossetians and Georgians have lived side by side for centuries. The two groups share Soviet history and the Orthodox Christian religion and intermarriage is common. But the ties that once bound their cultures have been severely damaged in the trauma of the recent fighting. Kosovo’s self-declared independence in February, too, has boosted these regions’ ambitions.

Most Abkhazians and South Ossetians carry Russian passports and the only valid currency is the Russian rouble. In addition, both self-declared republics have presidents, flags, national anthems, armies and Moscow’s support.

 



US envoy: Russia’s 1st military response in Georgia was “legitimate”

US envoy: Russia’s 1st military response in Georgia was “legitimate”

The Globe and Mail
August 22, 2008

The U.S. ambassador to Moscow, in a rare U.S. comment endorsing Russia’s initial moves in Georgia, described the Kremlin’s first military response as legitimate after Russian troops came under attack.

U.S officials, including President George W. Bush, have strongly criticized Moscow’s subsequent action but have not focused on the initial chain of events that triggered the conflict between Russian and U.S.-ally Georgia.

The war broke out after Georgia tried to retake its Moscow-backed breakaway region of South Ossetia, prompting a counter-attack by Russian forces.

In his first major interview since his arrival as Ambassador last month, John Beyrle gave the Russian daily Kommersant his views on the conflict and warned about its impact on U.S. investor confidence in Russia.

“Now we see Russian forces, which responded to attacks on Russian peacekeepers in South Ossetia, legitimately, we see those forces now having advanced on to the soil of Georgia; Georgian territorial integrity is in question here,” Mr. Beyrle told the newspaper.

He said Washington had not sanctioned Georgia’s initial actions when on Aug. 8, after a succession of tense skirmishes, Georgian forces attacked South Ossetia, triggering a massive Russian reaction when its peacekeepers there came under fire.

“We did not want to see a recourse to violence and force and we made that very, very clear,” Mr. Beyrle was cited as saying in quotes the U.S. embassy confirmed as accurate.

“The fact that we were trying to convince the Georgian side not to take this step is clear evidence that we did not want all this to happen,” Mr. Beyrle said in the interview, which was published on Friday.

“We have seen the destruction of civilian infrastructure, as well as calls by some Russian politicians to change the democratically-elected government of Georgia. Some question the territorial integrity of Georgia. That is why we believe that Russia has gone too far,” the envoy said.

Mr. Beyrle said Washington still supports Russia’s bid to join the World Trade Organization, which has still not been finalized after more than a decade of talks.

“But American investors are now looking at the situation around Russia with concern and asking questions,” he said.

 

Georgian war leaves 1,492 Ossetians dead – local authorities

Russia Today
August 20, 2008

The total number of causalities of the Georgian – South Ossetian conflict has been revealed. According to local authorities the conflict has taken the lives of 1492 Ossetians. More than 5,000 people from South Ossetia are still in refugee camps in the south of Russia.

Approximarely 30,000 people fled from Georgia’s offensive on August 8. Many have been staying with relatives or have been taken in by ordinary charitable people. RT met a young family of refugees who are now trying to piece their shattered lives together.

Refugees rely on the kindness of strangers

Whoever’s won this war, the Ossetian people have lost the most. Two of them, Ruslan and Khatuna Khelekhsaeva, say everyting they owned in Tskhinvali now lies in ruins.

They are very clear as to who they blame for having destroyed their lives.

“We blame Georgia and America for the war. It’s the second time they’ve bombed us. We can’t bear it anymore. No one can guarantee that Georgia won’t bomb us again,” Ruslan said.

We asked Ruslan whether South Ossetia should indeed break away from Georgia.

“Independence would be good in theory but we cannot defend ourselves against Georgia. So we need to be part of Russia. If Russia didn’t support us, then there would probably be no ‘us’ left on this earth,” he added.

Khatuna’s eyes cannot hide her pain. She recounts her experience:

“After all we’ve gone through, I don’t want to go back to Tskhinvali. Words cannot describe the five days we spent hiding in our basement, scared for our lives. I am haunted by those memories.”

They arrived in North Ossetia to find the refugee camp overflowing. They were taken in by Natalya Gabarayeva, a local woman.

“I’m doing my best to take care of them. I feel so sorry for them. They arrived here with nothing, and needed a roof over their heads,” Gabaraeva said.

She added that although local authorities are doing what they can, it is still not enough for the numbes of people that fled South Ossetia.

 

‘Human rights were violated’ in Ossetia – European watchdog

Russia Today
August 23, 2008

Europe’s top human rights official has arrived in war-ravaged South Ossetia on a fact-finding mission. Commissioner Thomas Hammarberg from the Council of Europe Human is being accompanied by his Russian counterpart Vladimir Lukin. They say their goal is to gather evidence from all sides and to compile a report on their findings.

Thomas Hammarberg said: “I know that human rights were violated during the conflict.”

“I’m not going to involve myself in politics”, he said. “I am only here to look at the human rights situation and come up with recommendations on how these rights can be protected in the future. Our report will be objective and impartial”.

Vladimir Lukin added: “Many people had their rights violated, including the primary right to life, to housing, and so on. And this issue requires much attention – so we’ve come to find out what happened from that perspective.”

Read Full Article Here

 

Tensions are high in Georgia as Russian forces remain in position

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UxOg5RT8Dr4

Russia Lays to Rest Papa Bush’s New World Order
http://www.infowars.com/?p=4109

EU should save Ukraine from Russia, NGO says
http://euobserver.com/9/26638

Medvedev exclusive: We’re not afraid of Cold War
http://www.russiatoday.com/news/news/29490

Miliband Warning On New Cold War
http://uk.news.yahoo.com/skynews/20..ning-on-new-cold-war-3fd0ae9.html

US-Russia chill threatens NASA space program
http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5gFs-KdAHqfcOLpWZWcf5hjzXPYow

Explosion severs Azerbaijan-Georgia-Europe fuel railway link
http://www.debka.com/headline.php?hid=5530