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McClellan Will Testify Before House

McClellan Will Testify Before House

AP
June 10, 2008

President Bush’s former spokesman, Scott McClellan, will testify before a House committee next week about whether Vice President Dick Cheney ordered him to make misleading public statements about the leaking of CIA agent Valerie Plame’s identity.

McClellan will testify publicly and under oath before the House Judiciary Committee on June 20 about the White House’s role in the leak and its response, his attorneys, Michael and Jane Tigar, said on Monday.

In his new book, “What Happened: Inside the Bush White House and Washington’s Culture of Deception,” McClellan said he was misled by others, possibly including Cheney, about the role of I. Lewis “Scooter” Libby in the leak. McClellan has said publicly that Bush and Cheney “directed me to go out there and exonerate Scooter Libby.”

The statements prompted House Judiciary Committee Chairman John Conyers, D-Mich., to invite McClellan to the hearing “concerning reported attempts to cover up the involvement of White House officials in the leak of” Plame’s identity.

Plame’s CIA identity was leaked to the news media by several top Bush administration officials in 2003, including Libby and former top White House political adviser Karl Rove. Last July, Bush commuted Libby’s 2 1/2-year sentence, sparing him from serving any prison time after being convicted of perjury, obstructing justice and lying to the FBI.

House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Henry Waxman, D-Calif., also is seeking more FBI documents about the leak in part because of McClellan’s description of the way he was instructed to respond to questions on the matter.

At Libby’s trial, witnesses testified that Cheney, Libby and other Bush administration officials mounted a campaign to counter criticism of the Iraq war by Plame’s husband, Joseph Wilson. Cheney’s spokeswoman, Cathie Martin, testified that Cheney personally wrote out statements and talking points for Libby and other aides to give to reporters to rebut Wilson’s allegations.

 

McClellin: Bush Admits Authorizing Plame Leak

Democracy Now
May 30, 2008

Former White House Press Secretary Scott McClellan took to the airwaves Thursday to explain his speaking out on his former bosses in the Bush administration. In a new memoir, McClellan accuses the administration of deliberately manipulating the public to wage the war on Iraq. McClellan also criticizes his former bosses for the handling of Hurricane Katrina and the CIA leak case. Appearing on the Today Show, McClellan said he had mistakenly allowed his personal admiration for President Bush to overshadow concerns about the deceptive rush to war in Iraq.

Scott McClellan: “I felt like we were rushing into this, but because of my position and my affection for the President and my belief and trust in he and his advisers, I gave them the benefit of the doubt. And looking back on it and reflecting on it now, I don’t think I should have.”

McClellan went on to say President Bush had personally told him he authorized the leak of former CIA operative Valerie Plame’s identity. McClellan says he asked President Bush aboard Air Force One if he was the one who approved outing Plame to the media. McClellan says Bush replied, “Yes, I was.”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oft4K3f8364

 



McCellan: Bush Admits He Authorized Plame Leak

McCellan: Bush Admits He Authorized Plame Leak

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oft4K3f8364

 

Former White House spokesman: Bush used ’propaganda’ to sell war

Mike Sheehan
Raw Story
May 28, 2008

Update: Bush ’didn’t remember’ whether he’d tried cocaine, McClellan writes

In a new tell-all memoir on sale next week, former White House press secretary Scott McClellan writes that President Bush depended on propaganda to sell the Iraq war to the American public, The Politico reports.

According to the Atlanta Journal Constitution, McClellan also reveals new details about allegations regarding Bush’s former drug use that shadowed his 2000 campaign.

McClellan tracks Bush’s penchant for self-deception back to an overheard incident on the campaign trail in 1999 when the then-governor was dogged by reports of possible cocaine use in his younger days.

The book recounts an evening in a hotel suite “somewhere in the Midwest.” Bush was on the phone with a supporter and motioned for McClellan to have a seat.

“’The media won’t let go of these ridiculous cocaine rumors,’ I heard Bush say. ’You know, the truth is I honestly don’t remember whether I tried it or not. We had some pretty wild parties back in the day, and I just don’t remember.’”

“I remember thinking to myself, How can that be?” McClellan wrote. “How can someone simply not remember whether or not they used an illegal substance like cocaine? It didn’t make a lot of sense.”

Bush, according to McClellan, “isn’t the kind of person to flat-out lie.”

“So I think he meant what he said in that conversation about cocaine. It’s the first time when I felt I was witnessing Bush convincing himself to believe something that probably was not true, and that, deep down, he knew was not true,” McClellan wrote. “And his reason for doing so is fairly obvious — political convenience.”

In the years that followed, McClellan “would come to believe that sometimes he convinces himself to believe what suits his needs at the moment.” McClellan likened it to a witness who resorts to “I do not recall.”

McClellan’s “surprisingly scathing” and “often harsh” What Happened: Inside the Bush White House… also contains, as Mike Allen writes for Politico, other standout revelations such as:

  • Bush and his aides “confused the propaganda campaign with the high level of candor and honesty so fundamentally needed to build and then sustain public support during a time of war”;

  • Some of McClellan’s assertions before the White House press corps were, in retrospect, “badly misguided”;

  • Karl Rove and Lewis “Scooter” Libby “had at best misled” McClellan about their roles in the notorious CIA leak case, even as McClellan publicly defended them;

  • The White House was in a “state of denial” during the first week after the Hurricane Katrina disaster;

  • Bush was “steamed” about his top economic adviser telling The Wall Street Journal that a possible Iraq war could cost as much as $200 billion. “He shouldn’t be talking about that,” said Bush, according to McClellan;

  • The press was “probably too deferential to the White House” when it came to public discourse over the choice to go to invade Iraq. McClellan also says the “White House press corps went too easy on the administration,” reports Allen.

Despite the book’s criticisms of the administration he once worked for, McClellan writes, “I still like and admire President Bush,” reserving most of his rancor for Bush’s top advisers, especially Karl Rove.

Bush Aide Admits Manipulating Opinion On Iraq

MSNBC: White House Officals Are ‘Flat Out Angry,’ Calling McClellan ‘Traitor,’ ‘Benedict’
http://thinkprogress.org/2008/05/28/mcclellan-traitor/

McClellan: Plame leak the ’turning point’ in his disillusionment
http://rawstory.com/news/2008/McClellan_I_have_higher_loyalty_to_0529.html

CNN’s Yellin: Network execs killed critical White House stories
http://www.politico.com/blogs/mich.._killed_critical_White_House_stories_.html

Bill O’Reilly on “Judas” Scott McClellan
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HXjP72T0HKI