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Military and National Guard to Police DNC

Army Deploys All-In-One Nonlethal Warfare Kit

Wired
August 8, 2008

The U.S. Army is deploying an all-in-one package of nonlethal devices that covers everything from checkpoint control to riot control. “The first of the Brigade Non-Lethal Capability Sets (NLCS) is now fielded to the Army’s 1st Heavy Brigade Combat Team,” reports Defense Daily, an industry newsletter (sorry, subscription only).

The four modules include: the checkpoint module, crowd control and detainee ops module, convoy module, and dismounted module that includes various non-lethal items troops can use during dismounted patrols.

The kits are put into large, weatherproof containers, and include everything from high-intensity lights to loud speakers. The checkpoint tools, for example, includes “equipment to establish and operate hasty and deliberate checkpoints.” That means tire spikes and capture nets.

Other nonlethal sets have been fielded in the past, but the NLCS “includes items not found in the previous sets, such as tasers, Phraselators, Vehicle Lightweight Arresting Devices and Ex-Spray, which allows soldiers to detect explosive residue.”

 

Colorado ’fusion center’ to step up intelligence gathering during DNC

The Colorado Independent
July 30, 2008

Federal and state law enforcement officials will increase intelligence operations during the Democratic National Convention, overseeing an information war room that will be staffed around the clock with analysts who access a dozen databases while receiving reports of “suspicious activity” — activity that some civil libertarians claim could be nothing more than engaging in anti-war protests or photographing federal facilities that could be targeted for terrorist attack.

Central to the efforts is Colorado’s “fusion” center, a place designed to facilitate intelligence sharing among federal, state and military agencies in an effort to prevent terrorism. But civil rights advocates fear that the Colorado Information Analysis Center, (CIAC) now housed in an inconspicuous office building in Centennial, a southern suburb of Denver, could enable unwarranted spying on Americans exercising their First Amendment rights at the convention.

Inside the building, intelligence analysts with the Colorado State Patrol, Colorado National Guard and Federal Bureau of Investigation take local reports of suspicious criminal activity and determine what merits further investigation.

“It’s a filtration point for information,” says Lance Clem, a representative for the Colorado Department of Public Safety, which directs the state troopers who work at CIAC. “We take information from the international and national level and decide what needs to be pushed out to local law enforcement agencies.”

CIAC personnel also take reports of suspicious activities from citizens and other police departments. If a report is deemed by analysts to require additional investigation, it is shared with the appropriate law enforcement officials, but if a report is not determined to merit further inspection, CIAC workers make a log of the event, according to Clem, essentially creating a massive collection of data, some of it reliable and some of it not.

When the Democratic National Convention is held in August, CIAC will be operating 24 hours a day and be fully staffed with up to eight intelligence analysts at any given time.

“CIAC is going to be expanding hours for physical presence in the office,” Clem says about the convention. “Any known threats specifically related to the convention are going to go right to the United States Secret Service and FBI, but CIAC is going to be there to take any reports that citizens have.”

Malcolm Wiley, a spokesman for the Secret Service, says he can’t confirm if members of his agency will be physically present at CIAC while the convention takes place, but he does acknowledge the center’s part in analyzing intelligence data during the event.

“They’ll be sharing information with other intelligence gatherers,” including the Secret Service and FBI, Wiley says.

The military will also be sharing intelligence information and providing support through U.S. Northern Command, (NORTHCOM) a unit stationed at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado Springs that was created in 2002 for homeland defense missions.

While NORTHCOM personnel will not be working at CIAC during the convention, the unit will share information that is relevant to the center,as it has done occasionally in the past, according to Master Sgt. Anthony Hill, a NORTHCOM spokesman.

Federal and state law enforcement officials will increase intelligence operations during the Democratic National Convention, overseeing an information war room that will be staffed around the clock with analysts who access a dozen databases while receiving reports of “suspicious activity” — activity that some civil libertarians claim could be nothing more than engaging in anti-war protests or photographing federal facilities that could be targeted for terrorist attack.

Central to the efforts is Colorado’s “fusion” center, a place designed to facilitate intelligence sharing among federal, state and military agencies in an effort to prevent terrorism. But civil rights advocates fear that the Colorado Information Analysis Center, (CIAC) now housed in an inconspicuous office building in Centennial, a southern suburb of Denver, could enable unwarranted spying on Americans exercising their First Amendment rights at the convention.

Inside the building, intelligence analysts with the Colorado State Patrol, Colorado National Guard and Federal Bureau of Investigation take local reports of suspicious criminal activity and determine what merits further investigation.

“It’s a filtration point for information,” says Lance Clem, a representative for the Colorado Department of Public Safety, which directs the state troopers who work at CIAC. “We take information from the international and national level and decide what needs to be pushed out to local law enforcement agencies.”

CIAC personnel also take reports of suspicious activities from citizens and other police departments. If a report is deemed by analysts to require additional investigation, it is shared with the appropriate law enforcement officials, but if a report is not determined to merit further inspection, CIAC workers make a log of the event, according to Clem, essentially creating a massive collection of data, some of it reliable and some of it not.

When the Democratic National Convention is held in August, CIAC will be operating 24 hours a day and be fully staffed with up to eight intelligence analysts at any given time.

“CIAC is going to be expanding hours for physical presence in the office,” Clem says about the convention. “Any known threats specifically related to the convention are going to go right to the United States Secret Service and FBI, but CIAC is going to be there to take any reports that citizens have.”

Malcolm Wiley, a spokesman for the Secret Service, says he can’t confirm if members of his agency will be physically present at CIAC while the convention takes place, but he does acknowledge the center’s part in analyzing intelligence data during the event.

“They’ll be sharing information with other intelligence gatherers,” including the Secret Service and FBI, Wiley says.

The military will also be sharing intelligence information and providing support through U.S. Northern Command, (NORTHCOM) a unit stationed at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado Springs that was created in 2002 for homeland defense missions.

While NORTHCOM personnel will not be working at CIAC during the convention, the unit will share information that is relevant to the center,as it has done occasionally in the past, according to Master Sgt. Anthony Hill, a NORTHCOM spokesman.

Read Full Article Here

 

Military to commandeer campus for DNC operations

The Colorado Independent
July 29, 2008

The Colorado Army National Guard is expected to transform a private Denver university campus into a restricted military lodging area during the Democratic National Convention in August.

More than 400 soldiers could be stationed in official capacity on the campus according to the National Guard, but the Guard is not disclosing what the troops will be doing during the convention.

In mid-July The Colorado Independent reported that the Colorado National Guard was planning to rent more than 500 rooms around the Denver area for business relating specifically to the Democratic National Convention being held Aug 25-38.

At least 400 of those rooms will be used for nine days during Aug. 22-30 at Johnson & Wales University, the old University of Denver law school at 7150 Montview Blvd. in east Denver.

“We only have the Colorado Army National Guard staying with us.” says Lindsay Tracy, a spokeswoman for Johnson & Wales University.

The private university, offering culinary and hospitality programs, will be closed to students during the soldiers’ stay.

“They’re the only ones using the campus. The campus basically will be shut down during that time,” Tracy says. “Only essential staff will be allowed.”

Along with lodging at the school, the National Guard has also ordered more than 30 rooms at an Extended Stay America hotel in an unknown location and more than 70 rooms at the Drury Hotels, also located in east Denver, at 4400 Peoria St.

A Drury Hotels representative declined to comment, citing a policy to not release information about guests.

The Colorado National Guard — composed of both Air and Army Guard units totaling over 5,000 military personnel — will not say why or how soldiers will be using the facilities, but officials have confirmed that no other federal or local agencies will be using the rooms.

“All we’re concerned with is the National Guard personnel,” says Capt. Robert Bell, a public affairs officer for the Colorado National guard. “That’s what we asked for.”

Bell says the soldiers will be on duty and wearing personal protective equipment, which can include helmets and combat armor. He also said weapons will be kept in National Guard armories, in the city of Centennial south of Denver, and at Buckley Air Force Base in Aurora. Both Johnson & Wales University and Drury Hotels are less than 10 miles from the base.

Maj. Gen. H. Michael Edwards, who was appointed by Democratic Gov. Bill Ritter as the adjutant general for Colorado in 2007, oversees both Army and Air National Guard operations in the state.

Bell and Tracy said they do not know how much taxpayer money will be spent on the room rentals.

Judge: ‘Security’ trumps free speech
http://www.reuters.com/article/politicsNews/idUSN0619904520080807

Nothing says “Change” like 3,000 cops in riot gear ready to bash your skull in
http://www.theseminal.com/2008/08/06/n..change-like-3000-cops-in-riot-gear/

 


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